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Hemangioma (Strawberry Hemangioma)

Abnormal lumps made up of blood vessels. A hemangioma is a benign and usually self-involuting tumor (swelling or growth) of the cells that line blood vessels. It usually appears in the first weeks of life. Self-involuting tumors eventually disappear.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: Wikipedia)

About Hemangiomas

A hemangioma is a nodule formed by blood vessels. Hemangiomas occur most commonly in the first days or weeks after birth. They are often found on the head or the neck, but they may also develop on the internal organs, most commonly the liver.

If a hemangioma continues to grow during the first weeks after birth, it is referred to as "growing" or "proliferative." However, they usually stop growing after a couple of weeks. Most hemangiomas then gradually disappear on their own. Only few hemangiomas cause complications such as ulcers, scars or bleeding. Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Heath Care

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Percutaneous vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures caused by osteoporosis, malignancy, or hemangioma

Bibliographic details: Mark D, Aronson N, Ziegler K M, Bonnell C J, Gere M A, Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Medical Advisory Panel.  Percutaneous vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures caused by osteoporosis, malignancy, or hemangioma. Chicago, IL, USA: Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, Technology Evaluation Center. TEC Assessment Program; 19(13). 2004

No evidence to support or refute elective surgery for benign liver tumours

The most common benign liver tumours include cavernous haemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, and hepatic adenoma. The majority of patients are asymptomatic, and no treatment is indicated. The natural history of haemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia is typically uneventful whereas that of hepatic adenoma can be complicated by life‐threatening conditions, such as rupture and haemorrhage. For these complications or when a definite histologic diagnosis is needed, surgery is advisable. However, in clinical practice there is a wide variation concerning the use of elective surgery (ie, surgery performed before complications have developed). No randomised clinical trials were identified for this systematic review, but 31 case series without a proper control group were retrieved. Accordingly, there is no evidence to support or refute elective surgery for benign liver tumours.

Treatments for strawberry birthmarks of the skin in infants and children

Infantile haemangiomas are soft, raised swellings on the skin, often with a bright, red surface. They are a non‐cancerous overgrowth of blood vessels in the skin. They are commonly known as 'strawberry birthmarks', 'strawberry naevi', or 'capillary haemangiomas'. They occur in five per cent of babies, with the majority appearing within the first few weeks of life, and reach their full size at about three to six months of age. The vast majority are uncomplicated and will shrink on their own by five to seven years of age and require no further treatment. However, some infantile haemangiomas may occur in high‐risk areas (such as near the eyes and nose which can result in impairment to vision and airway obstruction, respectively) and some of them are disfiguring and psychologically distressing to the children and their parents. Some may also develop complications so early medical treatment may be necessary. Corticosteroids are currently the standard treatment; however, it is not known which of a variety of treatments is best.

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Summaries for consumers

Propranolol (Hemangiol) for hemangioma in infants: Overview

Propranolol (trade name: Hemangiol) has been approved in Germany since April of 2014 for the treatment of growing hemangiomas in infants aged 5 weeks and older. A hemangioma is a nodule formed by blood vessels.

No evidence to support or refute elective surgery for benign liver tumours

The most common benign liver tumours include cavernous haemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, and hepatic adenoma. The majority of patients are asymptomatic, and no treatment is indicated. The natural history of haemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia is typically uneventful whereas that of hepatic adenoma can be complicated by life‐threatening conditions, such as rupture and haemorrhage. For these complications or when a definite histologic diagnosis is needed, surgery is advisable. However, in clinical practice there is a wide variation concerning the use of elective surgery (ie, surgery performed before complications have developed). No randomised clinical trials were identified for this systematic review, but 31 case series without a proper control group were retrieved. Accordingly, there is no evidence to support or refute elective surgery for benign liver tumours.

Treatments for strawberry birthmarks of the skin in infants and children

Infantile haemangiomas are soft, raised swellings on the skin, often with a bright, red surface. They are a non‐cancerous overgrowth of blood vessels in the skin. They are commonly known as 'strawberry birthmarks', 'strawberry naevi', or 'capillary haemangiomas'. They occur in five per cent of babies, with the majority appearing within the first few weeks of life, and reach their full size at about three to six months of age. The vast majority are uncomplicated and will shrink on their own by five to seven years of age and require no further treatment. However, some infantile haemangiomas may occur in high‐risk areas (such as near the eyes and nose which can result in impairment to vision and airway obstruction, respectively) and some of them are disfiguring and psychologically distressing to the children and their parents. Some may also develop complications so early medical treatment may be necessary. Corticosteroids are currently the standard treatment; however, it is not known which of a variety of treatments is best.

See all (6)

Terms to know

Lesion
A lesion is any abnormality in the tissue of an organism ("damage"), usually caused by disease or trauma.
Liver
The largest abdominal organ. The liver carries out many important functions, such as making important blood proteins and bile, changing food into energy, and cleaning alcohol and poisons from the blood.
Nodule
A growth or lump that may be malignant (cancer) or benign (not cancer).
Self-Involuting Tumor
Growing lesions that eventually disappear.

More about Hemangioma

Photo of a baby

Also called: Infantile hemangioma

Other terms to know: See all 4
Lesion, Liver, Nodule

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