Cysts

A sac or capsule in the body. It may be filled with fluid or other material.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Cancer Institute)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Oral contraceptives to treat cysts of the ovary

Women of reproductive age usually release an egg about once a month. The ovary gets an egg from the inside of the ovary to its surface by creating a blister or fluid‐filled space around the developing egg. When the blister (or cyst) reaches the surface of the ovary, it bursts and releases the egg into the abdominal cavity. After this occurs, the blister can develop into another type of cyst, which makes a hormone (progesterone) that helps the pregnancy to grow. Most of these cysts come and go without problems. Sometimes, however, the cysts get large or painful; others may remain for months. Several decades ago, health care providers learned that women taking birth control pills had fewer cysts, since the pills usually kept an egg from being released. Based on this fact, many clinicians started treating these cysts with birth control pills to make them go away faster.

Percutaneous needle aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration with or without benzimidazole coverage for uncomplicated hepatic hydatid cysts

Two randomised clinical trials on the puncture, aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration method for patients with uncomplicated hepatic hydatid cyst were identified. One trial compared puncture, aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration with surgical treatment. The other trial compared puncture, aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration with or without albendazole with albendazole alone. Both trials had high risk of bias. The number of participants enrolled and the follow‐up duration are insufficient for a definite conclusion to be drawn. In general, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the puncture, aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration method with or without benzimidazole coverage for patients with uncomplicated hepatic hydatid cyst.

Treatments for simple bone cysts in the long bones of children

Simple bone cysts ('unicameral' or 'solitary' bone cysts) are the most common type of non‐cancerous (benign) bone abnormality (lesion) in growing children. Cysts make the bone cortex (hard outer layer of bone) thin and may lead to repeated pathological fracture (one that occurs without much trauma in an area of weakened bone). Occasionally, such fractures can result in limb shortening and deformity. The main goals when treating simple bone cysts are to decrease the risk of pathological fracture, assist cyst healing and stop pain. There are several treatment methods available but there is no agreement about which is best. Therefore, we made a thorough review of the available evidence for different methods of treating simple bone cysts in the long bones of children to see if we could identify which method is best.

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Summaries for consumers

Oral contraceptives to treat cysts of the ovary

Women of reproductive age usually release an egg about once a month. The ovary gets an egg from the inside of the ovary to its surface by creating a blister or fluid‐filled space around the developing egg. When the blister (or cyst) reaches the surface of the ovary, it bursts and releases the egg into the abdominal cavity. After this occurs, the blister can develop into another type of cyst, which makes a hormone (progesterone) that helps the pregnancy to grow. Most of these cysts come and go without problems. Sometimes, however, the cysts get large or painful; others may remain for months. Several decades ago, health care providers learned that women taking birth control pills had fewer cysts, since the pills usually kept an egg from being released. Based on this fact, many clinicians started treating these cysts with birth control pills to make them go away faster.

Percutaneous needle aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration with or without benzimidazole coverage for uncomplicated hepatic hydatid cysts

Two randomised clinical trials on the puncture, aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration method for patients with uncomplicated hepatic hydatid cyst were identified. One trial compared puncture, aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration with surgical treatment. The other trial compared puncture, aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration with or without albendazole with albendazole alone. Both trials had high risk of bias. The number of participants enrolled and the follow‐up duration are insufficient for a definite conclusion to be drawn. In general, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the puncture, aspiration, injection, and re‐aspiration method with or without benzimidazole coverage for patients with uncomplicated hepatic hydatid cyst.

Treatments for simple bone cysts in the long bones of children

Simple bone cysts ('unicameral' or 'solitary' bone cysts) are the most common type of non‐cancerous (benign) bone abnormality (lesion) in growing children. Cysts make the bone cortex (hard outer layer of bone) thin and may lead to repeated pathological fracture (one that occurs without much trauma in an area of weakened bone). Occasionally, such fractures can result in limb shortening and deformity. The main goals when treating simple bone cysts are to decrease the risk of pathological fracture, assist cyst healing and stop pain. There are several treatment methods available but there is no agreement about which is best. Therefore, we made a thorough review of the available evidence for different methods of treating simple bone cysts in the long bones of children to see if we could identify which method is best.

See all (30)

More about Cysts

Photo of an adult woman

Also called: Cystic

See Also: Ovarian Cysts

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