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Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA)

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a heart problem that affects some babies soon after birth. In PDA, abnormal blood flow occurs between two of the major arteries connected to the heart. These arteries are the aorta and the pulmonary artery.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute)

About Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA)

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a heart problem that affects some babies soon after birth. In PDA, abnormal blood flow occurs between two of the major arteries connected to the heart. These arteries are the aorta and the pulmonary (PULL-mun-ary) artery.

Before birth, these arteries are connected by a blood vessel called the ductus arteriosus. This blood vessel is a vital part of fetal blood circulation.

Within minutes or up to a few days after birth, the ductus arteriosus closes. This change is normal in newborns.

In some babies, however, the ductus arteriosus remains open (patent). The opening allows oxygen-rich blood from the aorta to mix with oxygen-poor blood from the pulmonary artery. This can strain the heart and increase blood pressure in the lung arteries.

Go to the "How the Heart Works" section of this article for more details about how a normal heart works compared with a heart... Read more about Patent Ductus Arteriosus

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus doses of indomethacin for patent ductus arteriosus closure in symptomatic preterm infants

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) occurs when an artery near the heart and lungs stays open and does not close off after birth. Babies born early (preterm) have an increased risk of complications and death due to PDA. Indomethacin has been used to close the PDA; however, it can reduce blood flow in organs such as brain, kidneys and intestine. There is no agreement on the ideal dose and duration of treatment with indomethacin. In order to reduce the adverse effects of indomethacin on blood flow, some investigators have recommended administering the same total dose as a continuous infusion over 36 hours. In this review, the analysis of the two eligible trials found that the data was insufficient to reach a conclusion regarding the effectiveness of the 36‐hr continuous infusion method. The blood flow lowering side‐effects of indomethacin were reduced by the continuous infusion method, but there was insufficient data to recommend this administration method versus the traditional method.

Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants

PDA is a common complication for very preterm (premature) or very small babies. PDA is an open vessel that channels blood from the lungs to the body. It should close after birth, but sometimes remains open because of the baby's premature stage of development. PDA can lead to life‐threatening complications. Indomethacin is successful in causing PDA closure, but can cause serious adverse effects. Another option is the drug ibuprofen, which can be given to try and prevent PDA. This updated review of trials found that ibuprofen can prevent PDA, but does not confer any other short‐term or long‐term benefits.

Prophylactic surgical ligation of patent ductus arteriosus for prevention of mortality and morbidity in extremely low birth weight infants

There is no evidence to support the use of prophylactic surgical ligation of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in the management of the preterm infants.

See all (70)

Summaries for consumers

Continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus doses of indomethacin for patent ductus arteriosus closure in symptomatic preterm infants

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) occurs when an artery near the heart and lungs stays open and does not close off after birth. Babies born early (preterm) have an increased risk of complications and death due to PDA. Indomethacin has been used to close the PDA; however, it can reduce blood flow in organs such as brain, kidneys and intestine. There is no agreement on the ideal dose and duration of treatment with indomethacin. In order to reduce the adverse effects of indomethacin on blood flow, some investigators have recommended administering the same total dose as a continuous infusion over 36 hours. In this review, the analysis of the two eligible trials found that the data was insufficient to reach a conclusion regarding the effectiveness of the 36‐hr continuous infusion method. The blood flow lowering side‐effects of indomethacin were reduced by the continuous infusion method, but there was insufficient data to recommend this administration method versus the traditional method.

Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants

PDA is a common complication for very preterm (premature) or very small babies. PDA is an open vessel that channels blood from the lungs to the body. It should close after birth, but sometimes remains open because of the baby's premature stage of development. PDA can lead to life‐threatening complications. Indomethacin is successful in causing PDA closure, but can cause serious adverse effects. Another option is the drug ibuprofen, which can be given to try and prevent PDA. This updated review of trials found that ibuprofen can prevent PDA, but does not confer any other short‐term or long‐term benefits.

Prophylactic surgical ligation of patent ductus arteriosus for prevention of mortality and morbidity in extremely low birth weight infants

There is no evidence to support the use of prophylactic surgical ligation of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in the management of the preterm infants.

See all (39)

Terms to know

Aorta
The largest artery in the body. It carries oxygen-rich blood away from the heart to vessels that reach the rest of the body.
Arteries
A blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to tissues and organs in the body.
Blood Pressure
The force of blood exerted on the inside walls of blood vessels. Blood pressure is expressed as two numbers. For example, a blood pressure result of 120/80 is said as "120 over 80."
Congenital
Present since birth.
Heart
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Oxygen
A colorless, odorless gas. It is needed for animal and plant life. Oxygen that is breathed in enters the blood from the lungs and travels to the tissues.
Pulmonary Artery
The pulmonary artery and its branches deliver blood rich in carbon dioxide (and lacking in oxygen) to the capillaries that surround the air sacs.

More about Patent Ductus Arteriosus

Photo of a baby

Also called: Patent arterial duct, Patent ductus Botalli, Persistent ductus arteriosus

Other terms to know: See all 7
Aorta, Arteries, Blood Pressure

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