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Glomerulonephritis

Inflammation of the glomeruli. Most often, it is caused by an autoimmune disease, but it can also result from infection.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

About Glomerulonephritis

Many diseases affect kidney function by attacking the glomeruli, the tiny units within the kidney where blood is cleaned. Glomerular diseases include many conditions with a variety of genetic and environmental causes, but they fall into two major categories:

Although glomerulonephritis and glomerulosclerosis have different causes, they can both lead to kidney failure.

How do glomerular diseases interfere with kidney function?

Glomerular diseases damage the glomeruli, letting protein and sometimes red blood cells leak into the urine. Sometimes a glomerular disease also interferes with the clearance of waste products by the kidney, so they begin to build up in the blood. Furthermore, loss of blood proteins like albumin in the urine can result in a fall in their level in the bloodstream. In normal blood, albumin acts like a sponge, drawing extra fluid from the body into the bloodstream, where it remains until the kidneys remove it. But when albumin leaks into the urine, the blood loses its capacity to absorb extra fluid from the body. Fluid can accumulate outside the circulatory system in the face, hands, feet, or ankles and cause swelling... Read more about glomerular diseases NIH - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Interventions for renal vasculitis in adults

Renal vasculitis presents as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis which is a form of kidney disease that causes damage to the small structures (glomeruli) inside the kidneys that help filter waste and fluids from blood to form urine. The disease leads to a rapid loss of kidney function. Standard immunosuppression with steroids and cyclophosphamide (CPA) is recommended. The aim of this review was to evaluate the benefits and harms of any intervention for the treatment of renal vasculitis. Thirteen studies (702 patients) were identified. Plasma exchange reduces the risk of end‐stage kidney disease in patients presenting with severe acute kidney failure. The use of pulse CPA results in good remission rates but an increased risk of relapse. AZA is effective as maintenance therapy once remission has been achieved.

People with IgA nephropathy might have a better chance of avoiding kidney failure if they use immunosuppressive drugs (including steroids), but more research is needed

IgA nephropathy is a common kidney disease that progresses very slowly. It often leads to decreased kidney function and ultimately to kidney failure. The cause of this disease is not known, although most people with the disease have abnormalities in their immune system. The review found that if people with IgA nephropathy take immunosuppressive drugs, such as steroids, they may be less likely to develop kidney failure. However, more research is needed to be certain, to identify which people might benefit most from the treatment, and to study adverse effects.

Non‐immunosuppressive treatment for IgA nephropathy

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerular disease with approximately 30% to 40% of patients progressing to end‐stage kidney disease (ESKD) within 20 years. The most common regimens include immunosuppressive agents, however the risks of long‐term treatment often outweigh the potential benefits. Non‐immunosuppressive options, including fish oils, anticoagulants, antihypertensive agents and tonsillectomy have also been examined but not reviewed systematically.

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Summaries for consumers

Interventions for renal vasculitis in adults

Renal vasculitis presents as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis which is a form of kidney disease that causes damage to the small structures (glomeruli) inside the kidneys that help filter waste and fluids from blood to form urine. The disease leads to a rapid loss of kidney function. Standard immunosuppression with steroids and cyclophosphamide (CPA) is recommended. The aim of this review was to evaluate the benefits and harms of any intervention for the treatment of renal vasculitis. Thirteen studies (702 patients) were identified. Plasma exchange reduces the risk of end‐stage kidney disease in patients presenting with severe acute kidney failure. The use of pulse CPA results in good remission rates but an increased risk of relapse. AZA is effective as maintenance therapy once remission has been achieved.

People with IgA nephropathy might have a better chance of avoiding kidney failure if they use immunosuppressive drugs (including steroids), but more research is needed

IgA nephropathy is a common kidney disease that progresses very slowly. It often leads to decreased kidney function and ultimately to kidney failure. The cause of this disease is not known, although most people with the disease have abnormalities in their immune system. The review found that if people with IgA nephropathy take immunosuppressive drugs, such as steroids, they may be less likely to develop kidney failure. However, more research is needed to be certain, to identify which people might benefit most from the treatment, and to study adverse effects.

Non‐immunosuppressive treatment for IgA nephropathy

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerular disease with approximately 30% to 40% of patients progressing to end‐stage kidney disease (ESKD) within 20 years. The most common regimens include immunosuppressive agents, however the risks of long‐term treatment often outweigh the potential benefits. Non‐immunosuppressive options, including fish oils, anticoagulants, antihypertensive agents and tonsillectomy have also been examined but not reviewed systematically.

See all (9)

Terms to know

Autoimmune Disease
Disease that results when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissues. Examples include multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus.
Glomerular Filtration Rate
The rate at which the kidneys filter wastes and extra fluid from the blood, measured in milliliters per minute.
Glomeruli
A tiny set of looping blood vessels in the nephron where blood is filtered in the kidney. Plural of glomerulus.
Glomerulosclerosis
Scarring of the glomeruli. It may result from diabetes (diabetic glomerulosclerosis) or from deposits in parts of the glomeruli (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). The most common signs of glomerulosclerosis are proteinuria and chronic kidney disease.
Nephrons
A tiny part of the kidneys. Each kidney is made up of about 1 million nephrons, which are the working units of the kidneys, removing wastes and extra fluids from the blood.
Nephrotic Syndrome
A collection of symptoms that indicate kidney damage. Symptoms include high levels of protein in the urine, lack of protein in the blood, and high blood cholesterol.

More about Glomerulonephritis

Photo of an adult

Also called: GN

Other terms to know: See all 6
Autoimmune Disease, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Glomeruli

Related articles:
How the Kidneys Work

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