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Farsightedness (Hyperopia): Treatments

A disorder of the vision where the eye focuses images behind the retina instead of on it, so that distant objects can be seen better than near objects.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: Wiktionary)

About Hyperopia Treatments

Hyperopia can be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, or surgery.

Eyeglasses are the simplest and safest way to correct hyperopia. Your eye care professional can prescribe lenses that will help correct the problem and help you see your best.

Contact Lenses work by becoming the first refractive surface for light rays entering the eye, causing a more precise refraction or focus. In many cases, contact lenses provide clearer vision, a wider field of vision, and greater comfort. They are a safe and effective option if fitted and used properly. However, contact lenses are not right for everyone. Discuss this with your eye care professional.

Refractive Surgery aims to permanently change the shape of the cornea which will improve refractive vision. Surgery can decrease or eliminate dependency on wearing eyeglasses and contact lenses. There are many types of refractive surgeries and surgical options should be discussed with an eye care professional. NIH - National Eye Institute

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Screening for Visual Impairment in Children Ages 1-5 Years: Systematic Review to Update the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation [Internet]

Impaired visual acuity is common in preschool-aged children. Screening for impaired visual acuity in primary care settings could identify children with vision problems at a critical period of visual development and lead to interventions to improve vision, function, and quality of life.

Screening for Visual Impairment in Older Adults: Systematic Review to Update the 1996 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation [Internet]

Impaired visual acuity is common in older adults. Screening for impaired visual acuity in primary care settings could identify older adults who are unaware of or do not report vision problems, and lead to interventions to improve vision, function and quality of life.

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