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Peritonitis

Inflammation of the peritoneum (tissue that lines the abdominal wall and covers most of the organs in the abdomen). Peritonitis can result from infection, injury, or certain diseases. Symptoms may include swelling of the abdomen, severe pain, and weight loss.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Cancer Institute)

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Y‐set and double bag systems offer the most protection against peritonitis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)

People with advanced kidney disease may be treated with CAPD where a catheter is permanently inserted into the peritoneum (lining around abdominal contents) through the abdominal wall and sterile fluid is drained in and out a few times each day. The most common serious complication is infection of the peritoneum ‐ peritonitis. This may be caused by bacteria accidentally being transferred from the catheter. This review of trials compared three types of connecting systems (used to connect the bags and the catheter) and found the Y‐set and double bag exchange systems are the most effective in preventing peritonitis.

Antibiotics are effective in preventing post‐operative complications following infection of the peritoneum (peritonitis), but there is no evidence to support that one regimen is superior to another, and at the same time has less side effects.

Patients with peritonitis originated from the gut will often require surgery. Antibiotics are useful in the treatment of the ongoing infection and for prevention of post‐operative complications.

No reduction in the incidence of peritonitis could be shown from catheter‐related interventions for peritoneal dialysis

People with advanced kidney disease may be treated with peritoneal dialysis where a catheter is permanently inserted into the peritoneum (lining around abdominal contents) through the abdominal wall and sterile fluid is drained in and out a few times each day. The most common serious complication is infection of the peritoneum ‐ peritonitis. This may be caused by bacteria accidentally being transferred from the catheter. This review of different catheter types, insertion or immobilisation techniques showed that they do not reduce the incidence of peritonitis.

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Summaries for consumers

Y‐set and double bag systems offer the most protection against peritonitis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)

People with advanced kidney disease may be treated with CAPD where a catheter is permanently inserted into the peritoneum (lining around abdominal contents) through the abdominal wall and sterile fluid is drained in and out a few times each day. The most common serious complication is infection of the peritoneum ‐ peritonitis. This may be caused by bacteria accidentally being transferred from the catheter. This review of trials compared three types of connecting systems (used to connect the bags and the catheter) and found the Y‐set and double bag exchange systems are the most effective in preventing peritonitis.

Antibiotics are effective in preventing post‐operative complications following infection of the peritoneum (peritonitis), but there is no evidence to support that one regimen is superior to another, and at the same time has less side effects.

Patients with peritonitis originated from the gut will often require surgery. Antibiotics are useful in the treatment of the ongoing infection and for prevention of post‐operative complications.

No reduction in the incidence of peritonitis could be shown from catheter‐related interventions for peritoneal dialysis

People with advanced kidney disease may be treated with peritoneal dialysis where a catheter is permanently inserted into the peritoneum (lining around abdominal contents) through the abdominal wall and sterile fluid is drained in and out a few times each day. The most common serious complication is infection of the peritoneum ‐ peritonitis. This may be caused by bacteria accidentally being transferred from the catheter. This review of different catheter types, insertion or immobilisation techniques showed that they do not reduce the incidence of peritonitis.

See all (18)

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