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Seborrheic Dermatitis

Yellowish, oily, scaly patches of skin on the scalp, face, and occasionally other parts of the body.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)

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Evidence reviews

Antifungal treatments applied to the skin to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition found throughout the world, with rashes with varying degrees of redness, scaling and itching. It affects people of both sexes but is more common among men. The disease usually starts after puberty and can lead to personal discomfort and cosmetic concerns when rashes occur at prominent skin sites. Drugs that act against moulds, also called antifungal agents, have been commonly used on their own or in combination.

Topical anti‐inflammatory agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face or scalp

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin that most often affects areas of the body that have a lot of sebaceous glands. These include the skin of the scalp; face; chest; and flexure areas such as the armpits, groin, and abdominal folds. The most typical symptoms of seborrhoeic dermatitis are scaling of the skin and reddish patches. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is fairly common: one to three in 100 people have seborrhoeic dermatitis. The disease is more common in men than in women. Anti‐inflammatory, antifungal, and antikeratolytic treatments can be used to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis. The treatment does not cure the disease but relieves the symptoms.

Pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Seborrheic dermatitis is a common, chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin disorder that manifests as erythema, scaling and pruritus in sebum gland-rich areas of the skin. The objective of this article is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of pimecrolimus 1% cream in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis compared with corticosteroids, antimycotics, placebo or no intervention. Pimecrolimus 1% cream appears to be a well-tolerated and effective treatment for seborrheic dermatitis. It has comparable efficacy, in terms of decreasing severity of erythema, scaling and pruritus, to the standard treatments: topical corticosteroids and antimycotics. However, future studies with more standardized measures of treatment outcome are recommended. More studies may also be conducted to further evaluate pimecrolimus 1% cream as a long-term maintenance therapy for seborrheic dermatitis.

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Summaries for consumers

Antifungal treatments applied to the skin to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition found throughout the world, with rashes with varying degrees of redness, scaling and itching. It affects people of both sexes but is more common among men. The disease usually starts after puberty and can lead to personal discomfort and cosmetic concerns when rashes occur at prominent skin sites. Drugs that act against moulds, also called antifungal agents, have been commonly used on their own or in combination.

Topical anti‐inflammatory agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face or scalp

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin that most often affects areas of the body that have a lot of sebaceous glands. These include the skin of the scalp; face; chest; and flexure areas such as the armpits, groin, and abdominal folds. The most typical symptoms of seborrhoeic dermatitis are scaling of the skin and reddish patches. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is fairly common: one to three in 100 people have seborrhoeic dermatitis. The disease is more common in men than in women. Anti‐inflammatory, antifungal, and antikeratolytic treatments can be used to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis. The treatment does not cure the disease but relieves the symptoms.

More about Seborrheic Dermatitis

Photo of a young adult

Also called: Seborrhoeic dermatitis, Seborrhoeic eczema, Seborrhoea, Seborrheic eczema, Seborrhea, Dandruff, Cradle cap, SBD

Other terms to know:
Oil Glands (Sebaceous Glands)

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