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Seborrheic Dermatitis

Yellowish, oily, scaly patches of skin on the scalp, face, and occasionally other parts of the body. NIH - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Bibliographic details: Ang-Tiu CU, Meghrajani CF, Maano CC.  Pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology 2012; 5(1): 91-97

Topical antifungal agents for seborrheic dermatitis: systematic review and meta-analysis

OBJECTIVE: Assess the efficacy of topical antifungal agents for seborrheic dermatitis treatment.

Topical anti‐inflammatory agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face or scalp

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin that most often affects areas of the body that have a lot of sebaceous glands. These include the skin of the scalp; face; chest; and flexure areas such as the armpits, groin, and abdominal folds. The most typical symptoms of seborrhoeic dermatitis are scaling of the skin and reddish patches. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is fairly common: one to three in 100 people have seborrhoeic dermatitis. The disease is more common in men than in women. Anti‐inflammatory, antifungal, and antikeratolytic treatments can be used to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis. The treatment does not cure the disease but relieves the symptoms.

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Summaries for consumers

Topical anti‐inflammatory agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face or scalp

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin that most often affects areas of the body that have a lot of sebaceous glands. These include the skin of the scalp; face; chest; and flexure areas such as the armpits, groin, and abdominal folds. The most typical symptoms of seborrhoeic dermatitis are scaling of the skin and reddish patches. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is fairly common: one to three in 100 people have seborrhoeic dermatitis. The disease is more common in men than in women. Anti‐inflammatory, antifungal, and antikeratolytic treatments can be used to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis. The treatment does not cure the disease but relieves the symptoms.

More about Seborrheic Dermatitis

Photo of a young adult

Also called: Seborrhoeic dermatitis, Seborrhoeic eczema, Seborrhoea, Seborrheic eczema, Seborrhea, Dandruff, Cradle cap, SBD

Other terms to know:
Sebaceous Glands (Oil glands)

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