Home > Health A – Z > Rh Incompatibility

Rh Incompatibility

Rh incompatibility is a condition that occurs during pregnancy if a woman has Rh-negative blood and her baby has Rh-positive blood. "Rh-negative" and "Rh-positive" refer to whether your blood has Rh factor. Rh factor is a protein on red blood cells.

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute)

Rh Incompatibility

Rh incompatibility is a condition that occurs during pregnancy if a woman has Rh-negative blood and her baby has Rh-positive blood.

"Rh-negative" and "Rh-positive" refer to whether your blood has Rh factor. Rh factor is a protein on red blood cells. If you have Rh factor, you're Rh-positive. If you don't have it, you're Rh-negative. Rh factor is inherited (passed from parents to children through the genes). Most people are Rh-positive.

Whether you have Rh factor doesn't affect your general health. However, it can cause problems during pregnancy.

Overview

When you're pregnant, blood from your baby can cross into your bloodstream, especially during delivery. If you're Rh-negative and your baby is Rh-positive, your body will react to the baby's blood as a foreign substance.

Your body will create antibodies (proteins) against the baby's Rh-positive blood. These antibodies usually don't cause problems... Read more about Rh Incompatibility

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Meta analysis of the effect of immunoglobulin infusion on neonatal isoimmune hemolytic disease caused by blood group incompatibility

OBJECTIVE: Neonatal isoimmune hemolytic disease is still one of the major causes of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The infants with severe hemolysis even need phototherapy and exchange transfusion. Early intravenous immunoglobulin infusion may block hemolysis to some extent. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of immunoglobulin infusion on neonatal isoimmune hemolytic disease by meta analysis.

Neonatal Jaundice

Jaundice is one of the most common conditions requiring medical attention in newborn babies. Approximately 60% of term and 80% of preterm babies develop jaundice in the first week of life, and about 10% of breastfed babies are still jaundiced at 1 month of age. In most babies with jaundice thevre is no underlying disease, and this early jaundice (termed ‘physiological jaundice’) is generally harmless. However, there are pathological causes of jaundice in the newborn, which, although rare, need to be detected. Such pathological jaundice may co-exist with physiological jaundice.

Screening for Bilirubin Encephalopathy [Internet]

Kernicterus or chronic bilirubin encephalopathy is a devastating disease. Thus, it is important to examine strategies to prevent the development of kernicterus.

See all (12)

More about Rh Incompatibility

Photo of a pregnant woman

Also called: Rhesus incompatibility

See Also: Blood

Other terms to know:
Hemoglobin, Red Blood Cells (Erythrocytes), Rh Factor

Related articles:
Rho(D) Immune Globulin

Keep up with systematic reviews on Rh Incompatibility:

RSS

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...