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Ulipristal (By mouth)

Prevents pregnancy. This medicine is an emergency contraceptive pill.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Ulipristal is an emergency contraceptive that is used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or after failure of another birth control method. It works by preventing or delaying the release of a woman's egg from the ovary (ovulation). It may also prevent the attachment of the woman's egg to the wall of the uterus (womb). This medicine should not be used as a regular birth control method.… Read more
Brand names include
Ella
Drug classes About this
Contraceptive

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Ulipristal Acetate (Fibristal) (5 mg Tablets): Treatment of Moderate to Severe Signs and Symptoms of Uterine Fibroids in Adult Women of Reproductive Age Who are Eligible for Surgery. The Duration of Treatment is Limited to Three Months [Internet]

The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of ulipristal acetate 5 mg for the treatment of the signs or symptoms due to uterine fibroids in adult women of reproductive age who are eligible for surgical intervention.

Prevention and management of nausea and vomiting with emergency contraception: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Nausea and vomiting are side effects of emergency contraception pill (ECP) use. Different ECP regimens and the use of antinausea drugs may prevent these side effects.

Methods of emergency contraception

Emergency contraception is using a drug or copper intrauterine device (Cu‐IUD) to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. This is a back‐up and not a regular contraceptive method. Mifepristone, ulipristal acetate and levonorgestrel are very effective with few adverse effects, and are preferred to an oestrogen and progestogen combined regimen. Levonorgestrel could be used in a single dose (1.5 mg) instead of two split doses (0.75 mg) 12 hours apart.  The copper IUD is the most effective emergency contraceptive method and is the only emergency contraceptive method to provide ongoing contraception if left in situ.

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Summaries for consumers

Methods of emergency contraception

Emergency contraception is using a drug or copper intrauterine device (Cu‐IUD) to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. This is a back‐up and not a regular contraceptive method. Mifepristone, ulipristal acetate and levonorgestrel are very effective with few adverse effects, and are preferred to an oestrogen and progestogen combined regimen. Levonorgestrel could be used in a single dose (1.5 mg) instead of two split doses (0.75 mg) 12 hours apart.  The copper IUD is the most effective emergency contraceptive method and is the only emergency contraceptive method to provide ongoing contraception if left in situ.

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