Home > Drugs A – Z > Scopolamine (Absorbed through the skin)

Scopolamine (Absorbed through the skin)

Treat nausea and vomiting.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Scopolamine transdermal is used to prevent nausea and vomiting after anesthesia and surgery. It is also used to prevent the nausea and vomiting of motion sickness. Scopolamine belongs to the group of medicines called anticholinergics. It works on the central nervous system (CNS) to create a calming effect on the muscles in the stomach and intestines (gut). This medicine is available only with your… Read more
Brand names include
Transderm Scop, Transderm-V
Other forms
By injection
Drug classes About this
Antiemetic, Antivertigo
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Scopolamine for preventing and treating motion sickness

This Cochrane Review summarises evidence from 14 randomised controlled studies evaluating the effectiveness and safety of scopolamine for motion sickness. The results show that scopolamine is more effective than placebo and scopolamine‐like derivatives in the prevention of nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness. However, scopolamine was not shown to be superior to antihistamines and combinations of scopolamine and ephedrine. Scopolamine was less likely to cause drowsiness, blurred vision or dizziness when compared to these other agents.

Interventions to treat noisy breathing, or 'death rattle': the unpleasant, gurgling breathing occuring in many patients who are about to die

Approximately half of those relatives and friends who witness it, as well as hospital staff, find the noise of 'death rattle' distressing. For this reason, doctors and nurses try to eliminate the sound using a variety of methods, from changing the position of the patient to giving drugs to stop the noise. The aim of this review is to find out which treatment, if any, is best. Only four of 32 reports identified met the inclusion criteria for this review; none showed a convincing benefit of any single drug over any others. Some treatments may be worth trying but staff should watch carefully for any side effects of the treatment (e.g. agitation or excessively dry mouth). Anxious relatives need explanation, reassurance and discussion about any fears and concerns associated with the terminal phase and 'death rattle'. Research in this difficult area is necessary to understand the cause of the noise, its effect on the patient and those around them and the best ways of managing this condition.

Scopolamine as an antidepressant: a systematic review

OBJECTIVES: The cholinergic-adrenergic hypothesis of mania and depression states that depression is characterized by an increase in central cholinergic activity relative to noradrenergic tone. Scopolamine is a centrally acting competitive inhibitor of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor site. This review seeks to find all available data investigating scopolamine as an antidepressant.

See all (71)

Summaries for consumers

Scopolamine for preventing and treating motion sickness

This Cochrane Review summarises evidence from 14 randomised controlled studies evaluating the effectiveness and safety of scopolamine for motion sickness. The results show that scopolamine is more effective than placebo and scopolamine‐like derivatives in the prevention of nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness. However, scopolamine was not shown to be superior to antihistamines and combinations of scopolamine and ephedrine. Scopolamine was less likely to cause drowsiness, blurred vision or dizziness when compared to these other agents.

Interventions to treat noisy breathing, or 'death rattle': the unpleasant, gurgling breathing occuring in many patients who are about to die

Approximately half of those relatives and friends who witness it, as well as hospital staff, find the noise of 'death rattle' distressing. For this reason, doctors and nurses try to eliminate the sound using a variety of methods, from changing the position of the patient to giving drugs to stop the noise. The aim of this review is to find out which treatment, if any, is best. Only four of 32 reports identified met the inclusion criteria for this review; none showed a convincing benefit of any single drug over any others. Some treatments may be worth trying but staff should watch carefully for any side effects of the treatment (e.g. agitation or excessively dry mouth). Anxious relatives need explanation, reassurance and discussion about any fears and concerns associated with the terminal phase and 'death rattle'. Research in this difficult area is necessary to understand the cause of the noise, its effect on the patient and those around them and the best ways of managing this condition.

The effect of adding inhaled corticosteroids to tiotropium and long‐acting beta2‐agonists for managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease which includes the conditions chronic bronchitis and emphysema. COPD is characterised by blockage or narrowing of the airways. The symptoms include breathlessness and a chronic cough. COPD is an irreversible disease that is usually brought on by airway irritants, such as smoking or inhaled dust.

See all (17)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...