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Pertuzumab (Intravenous route)

Pertuzumab injection is used to treat breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. It is used together with other cancer medicines, docetaxel and trastuzumab, and only in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. The HER2 protein is produced by some breast tumors. Pertuzumab interferes with the growth of this protein, which is eventually destroyed by the body. It is a monoclonal antibody.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Pertuzumab is also used as part of a complete treatment regimen for early breast cancer before surgery. … Read more
Brand names include
Perjeta
Other forms
Injection
Drug classes About this
Antineoplastic Agent, Monoclonal Antibody

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Risk of rash with the anti-HER2 dimerization antibody pertuzumab: a meta-analysis

Pertuzumab is a novel humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) dimerization. It was recently approved by the US FDA for use in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer who have not received prior anti-HER2 therapy or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Rash is inconsistently reported as a common adverse event in most clinical trials of pertuzumab, at varying incidences. In this study, we have investigated the overall incidence and risk of rash with pertuzumab. Relevant studies were identified from the PubMed database (1966-2012), abstracts presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual conference (2004-2011), and Web of Science database (1998-2012). Eligible studies were prospective phase II-III clinical trials using pertuzumab in cancer patients. Incidence, relative risk (RR), and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects or fixed-effects models based on the heterogeneity of included studies. Data from a total of 1,726 patients (pertuzumab, n = 1,157; controls, n = 569) with breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers from eight clinical trials were included for analysis. The incidence of all-grade and high-grade rash with pertuzumab were 24.6 % (95 % CI 19.3-30.8 %) and 1.1 % (95 % CI 0.5-2.2 %), respectively. The risk varied with tumor types, as patients with prostate cancer had a lower incidence of rash (13.2 %; 95 % CI 8.0-21.1 %) than those with breast, ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancer (P = 0.001). Overall, pertuzumab significantly increased the risk of rash in comparison with controls (RR 1.53; 95 % CI 1.12-2.09; P = 0.007). Pertuzumab is associated with a significant risk of rash, and the incidence varies among different tumor types. Prevention, early recognition, and appropriate treatment of this rash may lead to improvement in patient quality of life, adherence to therapy, and possibly optimize clinical outcomes.

Are EGFR inhibitors, alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, likely to improve outcome in women with ovarian cancer?

Approximately a quarter of gynaecological cancers are of ovarian origin while ovarian cancers account for half of the deaths related to gynaecological cancers. The annual incidence world‐wide is about 6.6 cases per 100,000 women, with an annual mortality rate of four deaths per 100,000 women. Nine out of ten ovarian cancers arise from the surface layer of the ovary and three‐quarters of these are diagnosed at an advanced stage, when they have spread throughout the abdominal cavity. Treatment is usually a combination of surgery, to remove as much of the visible cancer as possible (debulking surgery), followed by platinum‐based chemotherapy to shrink remaining disease. The majority of ovarian cancers (70 to 80%) respond to chemotherapy. Unfortunately, most women will relapse and ultimately die because ovarian cancer cells become resistant to multiple types of chemotherapy.

Risk of severe diarrhea with dual anti-HER2 therapies: a meta-analysis

Although promising progress has been made with dual HER2 blockade in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer, whether the strategy of combined HER2 blockade increases the risk of severe diarrhea remains inclusive. In the present study, we investigated the overall incidence and risk of severe diarrhea when patients were treated with a combination of anti-HER2 therapies compared to anti-HER2 monotherapy. Studies that evaluated the administration of an anti-HER2 monotherapy (lapatinib or trastuzumab or pertuzumab) versus anti-HER2 combination therapy (pertuzumab plus trastuzumab or trastuzumab plus lapatinib) in breast cancer were identified from the PubMed database (1966-2013), the Cochrane library, abstracts presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual conference (2004-2013), and the Web of Science database (1998-2013). Eligible studies were those in which the only systematic difference between the study arms was the type of anti-HER2 therapy used. Incidence, relative risk (RR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects or fixed-effects models based on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Seven trials were considered eligible. The overall incidence results for severe diarrhea in the combined anti-HER2 therapy and the anti-HER2 monotherapy were 3.48% (95% CI: 11.60-15.37%) and 8.68% (9 % CI: 7.33-10.03%), respectively. The odds ratio (OR) of severe diarrhea between anti-HER2 combination therapy and monotherapy was 1.67 (95% CI: 1.38 -5.57, p = 0.00001). This meta-analysis provides evidence that the incidence rates of severe diarrhea are comparable between anti-HER2 combination therapy and anti-HER2 monotherapy.

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Summaries for consumers

Are EGFR inhibitors, alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, likely to improve outcome in women with ovarian cancer?

Approximately a quarter of gynaecological cancers are of ovarian origin while ovarian cancers account for half of the deaths related to gynaecological cancers. The annual incidence world‐wide is about 6.6 cases per 100,000 women, with an annual mortality rate of four deaths per 100,000 women. Nine out of ten ovarian cancers arise from the surface layer of the ovary and three‐quarters of these are diagnosed at an advanced stage, when they have spread throughout the abdominal cavity. Treatment is usually a combination of surgery, to remove as much of the visible cancer as possible (debulking surgery), followed by platinum‐based chemotherapy to shrink remaining disease. The majority of ovarian cancers (70 to 80%) respond to chemotherapy. Unfortunately, most women will relapse and ultimately die because ovarian cancer cells become resistant to multiple types of chemotherapy.

Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer.

PubMed Health Blog...

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