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Niacinamide (By mouth)

Lowers cholesterol and triglyceride levels in your blood. This medicine is a vitamin (B3).

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Brand names include
Pure Niacinamide
Other forms
On the skin
Drug classes About this
Antihyperlipidemic, Nutritive Agent
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Benefits and harm of niacin and its analog for renal dialysis patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

PURPOSE: Clinical trials have shown that niacin and its analog, niacinamide, significantly reduce serum phosphate in patients undergoing dialysis. This review aimed to assess the benefits and harm of niacin and niacinamide in renal dialysis patients.

Treatments for bullous pemphigoid

Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering disease in the West. Incidence figures are not available for most parts of the world but BP appears to be rarer in the Far East. Bullous pemphigoid is usually a disease of the elderly but it can also affect younger people and children. Both sexes are similarly affected. While BP usually resolves within five years, there is a moderate death rate associated with the disease and its treatment. Oral corticosteroid drugs are the most common treatment, but may be associated with serious adverse effects, including some deaths. The most common adverse effects of oral steroids, include weight gain and high blood pressure. Long‐term use is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and decreased bone density. Topical steroids are also associated with adverse effects, such as thinning of the skin and easy bruising. The risk of experiencing adverse effects of topical steroids depends on the strength of the steroid, how long it is used for, which area of the body it is applied to, and the kind of skin problem; if a high‐strength, potent steroid is used, enough may be absorbed through the skin to cause adverse effects in the rest of the body.

Phosphate binders for preventing and treating bone disease in chronic kidney disease patients

People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop impaired excretion of the dietary phosphorus. This results in a condition known as mineral and bone disorder in chronic kidney disease (CKD‐MBD). CKD‐MBD is characterized by high bone turnover, increased musculoskeletal morbidity including bone pain and muscle weakness, and vascular calcification which may contribute to the high incidence of cardiovascular disease and associated deaths. Several agents such as phosphate binders, vitamin D compounds, and calcimimetics are widely used to slow the development and progression of CKD‐MBD complications.

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Summaries for consumers

Treatments for bullous pemphigoid

Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering disease in the West. Incidence figures are not available for most parts of the world but BP appears to be rarer in the Far East. Bullous pemphigoid is usually a disease of the elderly but it can also affect younger people and children. Both sexes are similarly affected. While BP usually resolves within five years, there is a moderate death rate associated with the disease and its treatment. Oral corticosteroid drugs are the most common treatment, but may be associated with serious adverse effects, including some deaths. The most common adverse effects of oral steroids, include weight gain and high blood pressure. Long‐term use is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and decreased bone density. Topical steroids are also associated with adverse effects, such as thinning of the skin and easy bruising. The risk of experiencing adverse effects of topical steroids depends on the strength of the steroid, how long it is used for, which area of the body it is applied to, and the kind of skin problem; if a high‐strength, potent steroid is used, enough may be absorbed through the skin to cause adverse effects in the rest of the body.

Phosphate binders for preventing and treating bone disease in chronic kidney disease patients

People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop impaired excretion of the dietary phosphorus. This results in a condition known as mineral and bone disorder in chronic kidney disease (CKD‐MBD). CKD‐MBD is characterized by high bone turnover, increased musculoskeletal morbidity including bone pain and muscle weakness, and vascular calcification which may contribute to the high incidence of cardiovascular disease and associated deaths. Several agents such as phosphate binders, vitamin D compounds, and calcimimetics are widely used to slow the development and progression of CKD‐MBD complications.

Interventions for actinic keratoses

Actinic keratoses are a skin disease caused by long‐term sun exposure. Damaged skin shows small, red, rough, scaly, flat spots called actinic keratoses or lesions, which feel like patches of dry skin. Symptoms such as bleeding and pain can be associated with actinic keratoses. Moreover, actinic keratoses have the potential to develop into skin cancer if left untreated. The reasons for treatment may include cosmetic appearance, relief of symptoms, or prevention of skin cancer. Treatment can be directed either at individual lesions or to larger areas of the skin where several visible and less visible lesions occur (field‐directed treatment).

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