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Methylprednisolone (By injection)

Treats inflammation, severe allergies, flare-ups of ongoing illnesses, and many other medical problems. May also be used to decrease some symptoms of cancer. This medicine is a corticosteroid (cortisone-like medicine or steroid).

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Methylprednisolone injection provides relief for inflamed areas of the body. It is used to treat a number of different conditions, such as inflammation (swelling), severe allergies, adrenal problems, arthritis, asthma, blood or bone marrow problems, eye or vision problems, lupus, skin conditions, kidney problems, ulcerative colitis, and flare-ups of multiple sclerosis. Methylprednisolone is a… Read more
Brand names include
A-Methapred, Active Injection Kit L, Active Injection Kit LM-Dep-2, Depo-Medrol, Dyural-40, Dyural-80, Dyural-L, Dyural-LM, Multi-Specialty Kit, Novaplus Depo-Medrol, Novaplus Solu-Medrol, Physicians EZ Use M-pred Injection Kit, ReadySharp-P40, ReadySharp-P80, Solu-Medrol, SoluMEDROL
Other forms
By mouth
Drug classes About this
Endocrine-Metabolic Agent, Immune Suppressant

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Cyclophosphamide versus methylprednisolone for lupus

Researchers in The Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of the effect of cyclophosphamide for people with central nervous system lupus compared to the usual treatment of methylprednisolone. After searching for all relevant studies, they found one study with 32 people. The study compared people who took cyclophosphamide by IV (intravenous or through a vein) to people who took steroids (methylprednisolone by IV). All people took steroid pills (prednisone) at the beginning of the study and the amount was decreased over the study. The study lasted two years.

Effect of methylprednisolone on the prevention of fat embolism syndrome after diaphyseal fractures of the lower limb: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Zhao ZG, Jia XH, Kan WS, Li P.  Effect of methylprednisolone on the prevention of fat embolism syndrome after diaphyseal fractures of the lower limb: a meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Rehabilitative Tissue Engineering Research 2011; 15(39): 7392-7395 Available from: http://d.wanfangdata.com.cn/periodical_xdkf201139043.aspx

Effectiveness of methylprednisolone in acute spinal cord injury: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Steroid therapy has been tested as a protector in spinal cord injury. Multicenter studies evaluating the methylprednisolone (MP) in post traumatic neurological recovery have shown promising results according to NASCIS. A large number of critical studies related to the NASCIS results have been published.

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Summaries for consumers

Cyclophosphamide versus methylprednisolone for lupus

Researchers in The Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of the effect of cyclophosphamide for people with central nervous system lupus compared to the usual treatment of methylprednisolone. After searching for all relevant studies, they found one study with 32 people. The study compared people who took cyclophosphamide by IV (intravenous or through a vein) to people who took steroids (methylprednisolone by IV). All people took steroid pills (prednisone) at the beginning of the study and the amount was decreased over the study. The study lasted two years.

Steroids for acute spinal cord injury

Every year, about 40 million people worldwide suffer a spinal cord injury. Most of them are young men. The results are often devastating. Various drugs have been given to patients in attempts to reduce the extent of permanent paralysis. Steroids have probably been used more for this purpose than any other type of drug. The review looked for studies that examined the effectiveness of this treatment in improving movement and reducing the death rate. Nearly all the research, seven trials, has involved just one steroid, methylprednisolone. The results show that treatment with this steroid does improve movement but it must start soon after the injury has happened, within no more than eight hours. It should be continued for 24 to 48 hours. Different dose rates of the drug have been given and the so‐called high‐dose rate is the most effective. The treatment does not, however, give back the patient a normal amount of movement and more research is necessary with steroids, possibly combining them with other drugs.

Treatments for strawberry birthmarks of the skin in infants and children

Infantile haemangiomas are soft, raised swellings on the skin, often with a bright, red surface. They are a non‐cancerous overgrowth of blood vessels in the skin. They are commonly known as 'strawberry birthmarks', 'strawberry naevi', or 'capillary haemangiomas'. They occur in five per cent of babies, with the majority appearing within the first few weeks of life, and reach their full size at about three to six months of age. The vast majority are uncomplicated and will shrink on their own by five to seven years of age and require no further treatment. However, some infantile haemangiomas may occur in high‐risk areas (such as near the eyes and nose which can result in impairment to vision and airway obstruction, respectively) and some of them are disfiguring and psychologically distressing to the children and their parents. Some may also develop complications so early medical treatment may be necessary. Corticosteroids are currently the standard treatment; however, it is not known which of a variety of treatments is best.

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