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Levofloxacin (Injection)

Treats infections. This medicine is a quinolone antibiotic.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Levofloxacin injection is used to treat bacterial infections in many different parts of the body. It is also used to prevent an anthrax infection after a person has been exposed to anthrax. This medicine is also used to treat and prevent plague (including pneumonic and septicemic plague). Levofloxacin belongs to the class of medicines known as quinolone antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria or… Read more
Brand names include
Levaquin
Other forms
By mouth, Into the eye
Drug classes About this
Antibiotic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Meta-analysis of the efficacy of levofloxacin-based triple regimen and quadruple rescue regimen therapy for eradication of Helicobacter pylori

Bibliographic details: Zou J, Dong J, Yu XF.  Meta-analysis of the efficacy of levofloxacin-based triple regimen and quadruple rescue regimen therapy for eradication of Helicobacter pylori. World Chinese Journal of Digestology 2009; 17(11): 1160-1165

Effectiveness and safety of levofloxacin for multidrug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Zhu H, Lei X, Zhang F, Zhang ZJ, Lu J, Li H, Wang Y.  Effectiveness and safety of levofloxacin for multidrug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2012; 12(2): 201-208 Available from: http://www.cjebm.org.cn/en/oa/DArticle.aspx?type=view&id=201202013

Moxifloxacin versus levofloxacin for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Wang XH, Liu XJ.  Moxifloxacin versus levofloxacin for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2012; 12(6): 694-699 Available from: http://www.cjebm.org.cn/oa/DArticle.aspx?type=view&id=201206014

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Summaries for consumers

Antibiotics for community‐acquired pneumonia in adolescent and adult outpatients

This review studied the effects of antibiotics on adolescents and adults with pneumonia acquired and treated in the community (as opposed to acquiring pneumonia in hospital and/or being treated for pneumonia in hospital). The evidence is current to March 2014.

Interventions to treat chronic infection of the prostate gland (chronic bacterial prostatitis)

Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) involves infection and inflammation of the prostate gland in men of all ages. It can cause problems urinating, including discomfort and pain, increased frequency and urge, or problems emptying the bladder. Bacteria infecting the prostate are the cause of CBP. These bacteria may be sexually transmitted. To cure CBP, antibiotics must be administered for extended periods of time (four weeks or longer), but a permanent cure is not always guaranteed. Other drugs may be combined with antibiotics to improve CBP symptoms. This review found that fluoroquinolones like ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin or prulifloxacin have equivalent effects and equivalent success rates in CBP patients. If atypical bacteria like chlamydia are suspected to cause CBP, macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin may achieve better results compared to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. It must be taken into account that some of the studies that have been performed are of poor quality or have been performed on small numbers of participants. More studies are needed, focusing on new agents or on optimized doses of currently prescribed antibiotics.

Substituting or adding fluoroquinolones to established first‐line antituberculous drug regimens gives no additional benefit or risks

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. Over two billion people worldwide are believed to be latently infected with TB and approximately 10% of these people will develop active TB later in life. The World Health Organization currently only recommend treatment with fluoroquinolones for patients who cannot take standard first‐line drugs. In this review, we examined the effect of including fluoroquinolones in first‐line treatment regimens on people with presumed drug‐sensitive tuberculosis.

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