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Isoxsuprine (Oral route, Injection route)

Isoxsuprine belongs to the group of medicines called vasodilators. Vasodilators increase the size of blood vessels. Isoxsuprine is used to treat problems resulting from poor blood circulation.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor. Isoxsuprine is available only with your doctor's prescription… Read more
Brand names include
Vasodilan
Other forms
By mouth
Drug classes About this
Peripheral Vasodilator

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Use of isoxsuprine hydrochloride as a tocolytic agent in the treatment of preterm labour: a systematic review of previous literature

This review concluded that there was preliminary evidence in favour of the effectiveness of isoxsuprine in prolonging pregnancy in women at risk of abortion or premature delivery. This was based on the synthesis of small, old studies of unclear quality. Given multiple concerns over the evidence base and the review methods, the authors' conclusion cannot be regarded as reliable.

Beta2‐adrenoceptor agonists for primary dysmenorrhoea

As many as 50% of premenopausal women regularly suffer from menstrual pain. Many of these women may be incapacitated for one to three days during each menstrual cycle. Primary dysmenorrhoea (PD) is where women suffer from menstrual pain but lack any pathology in their pelvic anatomy. A wide range of treatments are available and some of these, such as beta2‐adrenoceptor agonists, have been used to treat women with primary dysmenorrhoea but their effects are unclear. Five studies involving 187 females with an age range of 15 to 40 years were included in this review. Oral isoxsuprine was examined in two studies; terbutaline oral spray, ritodrine chloride and oral hydroxyphenyl‐orciprenalin were compared with placebo in a further three studies. All of the studies were conducted over 30 years ago and none were of high quality. None of these medications, other than isoxsuprine combined with acetaminophen and caffeine, were reported to have any beneficial effect. Side effects with these medications were reported in up to a quarter of the participants and included nausea, vomiting, dizziness, quivering, tremor and palpitations. At present there is insufficient evidence to allow confident decision‐making about the use of beta2‐adrenoceptor agonists for dysmenorrhoea.

Treatments for leg ulcers in people with sickle cell disease

Leg ulcers are a chronic complication for people living with sickle cell disease. Ulcers tend to be difficult to treat successfully, healing slowly over months or years. They can severely disrupt quality of life, increase disability, require extended absence from the workplace, and place a high burden of care on healthcare systems. We looked at whether treatments for leg ulcers in people with sickle cell disease were effective and safe.

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Summaries for consumers

Beta2‐adrenoceptor agonists for primary dysmenorrhoea

As many as 50% of premenopausal women regularly suffer from menstrual pain. Many of these women may be incapacitated for one to three days during each menstrual cycle. Primary dysmenorrhoea (PD) is where women suffer from menstrual pain but lack any pathology in their pelvic anatomy. A wide range of treatments are available and some of these, such as beta2‐adrenoceptor agonists, have been used to treat women with primary dysmenorrhoea but their effects are unclear. Five studies involving 187 females with an age range of 15 to 40 years were included in this review. Oral isoxsuprine was examined in two studies; terbutaline oral spray, ritodrine chloride and oral hydroxyphenyl‐orciprenalin were compared with placebo in a further three studies. All of the studies were conducted over 30 years ago and none were of high quality. None of these medications, other than isoxsuprine combined with acetaminophen and caffeine, were reported to have any beneficial effect. Side effects with these medications were reported in up to a quarter of the participants and included nausea, vomiting, dizziness, quivering, tremor and palpitations. At present there is insufficient evidence to allow confident decision‐making about the use of beta2‐adrenoceptor agonists for dysmenorrhoea.

Treatments for leg ulcers in people with sickle cell disease

Leg ulcers are a chronic complication for people living with sickle cell disease. Ulcers tend to be difficult to treat successfully, healing slowly over months or years. They can severely disrupt quality of life, increase disability, require extended absence from the workplace, and place a high burden of care on healthcare systems. We looked at whether treatments for leg ulcers in people with sickle cell disease were effective and safe.

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