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Ipratropium (Into the nose)

Treats a runny nose caused by colds or hay fever.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Ipratropium nasal spray is used to relieve runny nose (rhinorrhea). The 0.03% nasal solution is used to relieve a runny nose caused by allergic and nonallergic perennial rhinitis. However, it does not relieve nasal congestion, sneezing, or postnasal drip caused by allergic or nonallergic perennial rhinitis. The 0.06% nasal solution is used for 4 days to relieve a runny nose caused by the common Read more
Brand names include
Atrovent
Other forms
By breathing, Inhalation route
Drug classes About this
Nasal Agent
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Inhaled short‐acting beta2‐agonists versus ipratropium for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

During an acute worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, there may be a worsening in airway function. Two different types of drugs may be given as inhaled therapy to improve this: anticholinergic drugs such as ipratropium and beta2‐agonists. These days the drugs of the latter type that are used for acute COPD are salbutamol and terbutaline, but neither of these drugs have been used in the only studies that we could find. We found only three small studies. Overall, both types of drug showed a small but worthwhile effect. There was no difference between them. Our review was not designed to test whether they would have had a greater effect if both were given at the same time.

A spray containing ipratropium bromide administered into the nose to treat common cold symptoms

The common cold is caused by a range of viruses and bacteria. It is the most common illness affecting humans. It causes a runny and stuffy nose, sore throat and sneezing. There is no proven cure for the cold and only symptom relief is available. The aim of this review was to investigate the use of a nasal spray containing ipratropium bromide (IB), which may improve cold symptoms. This review has found that IB may improve the runny nose but has no effect on nasal stuffiness.

Ipratropium bromide versus short acting beta‐2 agonists for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

This review looks at studies that compare the regular use for at least four weeks of different types of inhaled short‐acting bronchodilator medication in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, or emphysema/chronic bronchitis). There were eleven trials included. There were no major differences seen between the responses to ipratropium and salbutamol, or the combination. Where there were benefits, they were small and would not support a general recommendation for the use of ipratropium bromide or a combination with beta‐2 agonist over a beta‐2 agonist alone in COPD. People with COPD could use the short‐acting bronchodilator that gives them the most improvement in their symptoms.

See all (58)

Summaries for consumers

Inhaled short‐acting beta2‐agonists versus ipratropium for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

During an acute worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, there may be a worsening in airway function. Two different types of drugs may be given as inhaled therapy to improve this: anticholinergic drugs such as ipratropium and beta2‐agonists. These days the drugs of the latter type that are used for acute COPD are salbutamol and terbutaline, but neither of these drugs have been used in the only studies that we could find. We found only three small studies. Overall, both types of drug showed a small but worthwhile effect. There was no difference between them. Our review was not designed to test whether they would have had a greater effect if both were given at the same time.

A spray containing ipratropium bromide administered into the nose to treat common cold symptoms

The common cold is caused by a range of viruses and bacteria. It is the most common illness affecting humans. It causes a runny and stuffy nose, sore throat and sneezing. There is no proven cure for the cold and only symptom relief is available. The aim of this review was to investigate the use of a nasal spray containing ipratropium bromide (IB), which may improve cold symptoms. This review has found that IB may improve the runny nose but has no effect on nasal stuffiness.

Ipratropium bromide versus short acting beta‐2 agonists for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

This review looks at studies that compare the regular use for at least four weeks of different types of inhaled short‐acting bronchodilator medication in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, or emphysema/chronic bronchitis). There were eleven trials included. There were no major differences seen between the responses to ipratropium and salbutamol, or the combination. Where there were benefits, they were small and would not support a general recommendation for the use of ipratropium bromide or a combination with beta‐2 agonist over a beta‐2 agonist alone in COPD. People with COPD could use the short‐acting bronchodilator that gives them the most improvement in their symptoms.

See all (19)

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