Home > Drugs A – Z > Indomethacin (Injection)

Indomethacin (Injection)

Used in premature babies born with heart disease such as patent ductus arteriosus.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Indomethacin injection is used to treat patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature infants (babies born too early) who weigh between 500 and 1750 grams. PDA is a heart problem where a blood vessel, the ductus arteriosus, fails to close normally after birth. This blood vessel is only used before birth, and is no longer needed after the baby is born. Indomethacin injection works by causing the PDA… Read more
Brand names include
Indocin, NovaPlus Indomethacin, PremierPro Rx Indomethacin
Other forms
By mouth, Rectal route
Drug classes About this
Analgesic, Central Nervous System Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Fluid restriction and prophylactic indomethacin versus prophylactic indomethacin alone for prevention of morbidity and mortality in extremely low birth weight infants

Respiratory and long‐term neurosensory outcomes are common morbidities among extremely low birth weight (ELBW),(birth weight less than 1000 g) survivors. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a connection between vessels of the heart, is one of the known causes of respiratory morbidity. Indomethacin (a drug given early to close PDA) prophylaxis studies fail to show an improvement in the incidence of respiratory and long‐term outcomes, although there is a 50% reduction in the incidence of PDA. The addition of fluid restriction to indomethacin therapy might prove helpful. However, our review found no studies to answer this question.

Indometacin in use as a single dose for treating acute postoperative pain

Indometacin is a non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for treating postoperative pain. This review found only one small study of women with post‐episiotomy pain where the effectiveness of the drug (taken by mouth) was compared with a placebo. Conclusions about the effectiveness of orally administered indometacin cannot be made until more studies are undertaken.

No evidence for efficacy and safety of indomethacin for treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease

Extensive evidence implicates inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs such as indomethacin have been proposed for the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Only one study met criteria for inclusion. In this one selected trial, authors did not carry out statistical analyses on the absolute change from baseline, but on the percentage change from the baseline score. Taking into account the difficulties in evaluating a single trial, at present there is no indication for treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease with indomethacin.

See all (113)

Summaries for consumers

Fluid restriction and prophylactic indomethacin versus prophylactic indomethacin alone for prevention of morbidity and mortality in extremely low birth weight infants

Respiratory and long‐term neurosensory outcomes are common morbidities among extremely low birth weight (ELBW),(birth weight less than 1000 g) survivors. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a connection between vessels of the heart, is one of the known causes of respiratory morbidity. Indomethacin (a drug given early to close PDA) prophylaxis studies fail to show an improvement in the incidence of respiratory and long‐term outcomes, although there is a 50% reduction in the incidence of PDA. The addition of fluid restriction to indomethacin therapy might prove helpful. However, our review found no studies to answer this question.

Indometacin in use as a single dose for treating acute postoperative pain

Indometacin is a non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for treating postoperative pain. This review found only one small study of women with post‐episiotomy pain where the effectiveness of the drug (taken by mouth) was compared with a placebo. Conclusions about the effectiveness of orally administered indometacin cannot be made until more studies are undertaken.

No evidence for efficacy and safety of indomethacin for treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease

Extensive evidence implicates inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs such as indomethacin have been proposed for the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Only one study met criteria for inclusion. In this one selected trial, authors did not carry out statistical analyses on the absolute change from baseline, but on the percentage change from the baseline score. Taking into account the difficulties in evaluating a single trial, at present there is no indication for treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease with indomethacin.

See all (35)

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...