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Furosemide (Injection)

Treats fluid retention (edema) and swelling caused by congestive heart failure, liver disease, kidney disease, or other medical conditions. This medicine is a diuretic ("water pill").

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Furosemide injection is used to help treat fluid retention (edema) and swelling that is caused by congestive heart failure, liver disease (cirrhosis), kidney disease, or other medical conditions. Furosemide belongs to a group of medicines called loop diuretics or "water pills". It works by acting on the kidneys to increase the flow of urine. This medicine is to be given only by or under the direct… Read more
Brand names include
Furomide M.D., Lasix, Novaplus Furosemide
Other forms
By mouth
Drug classes About this
Cardiovascular Agent

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Continuous infusion versus bolus injection of furosemide in critically ill patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Zangrillo A, Cabrini L, Monti G, Stefano T, Moizo E, Vinciguerra F, Frau G, Biondi-Zoccai G G.  Continuous infusion versus bolus injection of furosemide in critically ill patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Signa Vitae 2011; 6(2): 58-63 Available from: http://www.signavitae.com/articles/original-articles/180

Continuous infusion versus bolus injection of furosemide in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized studies

Bibliographic details: Zangrillo A, Cabrini L, Biondi-Zoccai GG, Monti G, Turi S, Sheiban I, Bignami E, Landoni G.  Continuous infusion versus bolus injection of furosemide in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized studies. Signa Vitae 2012; 7(1): 17-22 Available from: http://www.signavitae.com/articles/original-articles/199-continuous-infusion-versus-bolus-injection-of-furosemide-in-pediatric-patients-after-cardiac-surgery-a-meta-analysis-of-randomized-studies

Narrative review: furosemide for hypercalcemia. An unproven yet common practice

This review concluded that evidence does not support the use of furosemide in common practice as the primary treatment of hypercalcaemia of any cause. Given several limitations with the included studies and review, including small sample size, indirect treatment comparisons and potential bias, and the paucity of current evidence, the authors' conclusions should be interpreted with extreme caution.

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Summaries for consumers

Furosemide for transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN)

It is common for full term infants born by elective caesarean section to have laboured, rapid breathing (tachypnoea) and to require oxygen for about 48 hours. This transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) is responsible for about half of all cases of neonatal respiratory distress. Although it is transient and not usually serious, the condition requires admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, involves separation of mother and baby, and uses of expensive resources. Furosemide is a diuretic medication which, in other circumstances, may reduce fluid in the lungs.

Furosemide for prevention of morbidity in indomethacin‐treated infants with patent ductus arteriosus

There is no strong evidence of benefit from routine use furosemide, a loop diuretic, in preterm babies receiving indomethacin for treatment of patent ductus arteriosus. A blood vessel (ductus arteriosus), which is required for blood circulation for the fetus in the womb, closes soon after birth in babies born around the expected date of delivery (term infants). Babies born early (preterm) may develop symptoms if they do not close that blood vessel after birth. Preterm infants who have symptoms due to the ductus arteriosus may receive therapy (indomethacin) for closing that vessel. Indomethacin may decrease kidney function and the amount of urine. Furosemide, a medication which reduces body water (diuretic), might help limit the effects of indomethacin on the kidney. This review analyzed the effects of furosemide on preterm babies receiving indomethacin to close the ductus arteriosus. The review of trials found not enough evidence to recommend routine use of furosemide in preterm infants who receive indomethacin for closing a ductus arteriosus.

Diuretic therapy for newborn infants with posthemorrhagic ventricular dilatation

Bleeding (hemorrhage) into the fluid‐producing cavities (ventricles) of the brain is a serious complication of premature birth. Large hemorrhages may result in fluid building up under pressure, progressively enlarging the brain and head. Current treatment approaches, including the insertion of a valve drainage system (shunt) are fraught with problems. Acetazolamide and furosemide, two drugs with diuretic action, reduce the production of fluid in the ventricles of the brain and have been proposed as safe treatments to treat dilatation of the ventricles after intraventricular hemorrhage in newborn infants. When compared with standard treatment, diuretic therapy was found not to reduce the need for shunt surgery. Diuretic drugs are neither safe nor effective in treating ventricular dilatation in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage.

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