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Dapsone (On the skin)

Treats severe acne.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Dapsone belongs to the family of medicines called antibiotics. Topical dapsone preparations are used on the skin to help control acne. They may be used alone or with one or more other medicines that are applied to the skin or taken by mouth for acne. They may also be used for other problems, such as skin infections, as determined by your doctor. This medicine is available only with your doctor's… Read more
Brand names include
Aczone
Other forms
By mouth
Drug classes About this
Antiacne

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Dapsone as an oral corticosteroid sparing agent for asthma

Some asthma sufferers rely on oral corticosteroids to control their disease. Corticosteroids help reduce the inflammation of the airways associated with asthma. Long‐term use of these drugs has serious side effects, so other ways to reduce the need for corticosteroids are sometimes tried. Dapsone does have anti‐inflammatory properties, and may have an effect on asthma symptoms and steroid doses taken. However, this review found that there was no evidence for or against the use of dapsone in the treatment of corticosteroid‐dependent asthmatic patients. More research is needed.

Screening for Speech and Language Delay in Preschool Children [Internet]

Speech and language development is a useful initial indicator of a child's overall development and cognitive ability. Identification of children at risk for delay may lead to interventions, increasing chances for improvement. However, screening for speech and language delay is not widely practiced in primary care.

Safety of Probiotics to Reduce Risk and Prevent or Treat Disease

To catalog what is known about the safety of interventions containing Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and/or Bacillus strains used as probiotic agents in research to reduce the risk of, prevent, or treat disease.

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Summaries for consumers

Dapsone as an oral corticosteroid sparing agent for asthma

Some asthma sufferers rely on oral corticosteroids to control their disease. Corticosteroids help reduce the inflammation of the airways associated with asthma. Long‐term use of these drugs has serious side effects, so other ways to reduce the need for corticosteroids are sometimes tried. Dapsone does have anti‐inflammatory properties, and may have an effect on asthma symptoms and steroid doses taken. However, this review found that there was no evidence for or against the use of dapsone in the treatment of corticosteroid‐dependent asthmatic patients. More research is needed.

Interventions for mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (rare autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin, eyes and mouth)

Mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita are rare autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin and mucous membranes (eyes and mouth). They can result in scarring, which may lead to disabling and life threatening complications. Treatments include corticosteroids, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide to suppress the immune system, and less toxic drugs such as antibiotics. These diseases often progress despite treatment. There is some evidence that mucous membrane pemphigoid involving the eyes may respond better to treatment with cyclophosphamide combined with corticosteroids, compared to treatment with corticosteroids alone. Cyclophosphamide is, however, associated with potentially severe adverse effects. Dapsone may help moderate disease. More research is needed to identify the most effective treatment options.There is not enough reliable evidence about treatments for the rare blistering diseases, mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

Interventions for pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus

This review of clinical trials aimed to find out which is the most effective and safest treatment option for pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus.

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