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Cysteine (Injection)

Treats cysteine deficiency in babies. This medicine is an amino acid. Amino acids are used by your body to make proteins.

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Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

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Amino Acid Supplement

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Supplementary vitamin E, selenium, cysteine and riboflavin for preventing kwashiorkor in preschool children in developing countries

Undernutrition is one of the leading underlying causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Providing antioxidants that would help curb excess free radicals in the body may help prevent the development of kwashiorkor. We identified one cluster‐RCT that attempted to investigate this. Based on the published evidence reviewed, we could draw no firm conclusions of the benefits of supplementary antioxidants for the prevention of kwashiorkor in pre‐school children. There is a need for further research in this area to be certain if antioxidant supplementation can help prevent kwashiorkor in young children.

Cysteine, cystine or N‐acetylcysteine supplementation in parenterally fed neonates

Sick or preterm newborn infants may require intravenous nutrition, including intravenous administration of solutions containing amino acids. Newborn infants need cysteine (an amino acid) for growth under certain conditions. Cysteine may decrease the chance of liver disease and brittle bones. This systemic review was done to analyze whether adding cysteine (or related compounds) to intravenous nutrition affects growth and other outcomes in newborn infants. Five trials studied the effects of adding cysteine to intravenous nutrition that did not contain cysteine. Addition of cysteine significantly improved the babies' ability to build body proteins (analyzed in four studies); however, it did not improve growth (analyzed in one study); no other outcomes were available. One large randomized trial studied the effect of adding another chemical, N‐acetyl‐cysteine, to intravenous nutrition that already contained cysteine. This study showed no benefit and no toxicity of this intervention. We conclude that present data are insufficient to justify routine addition of cysteine to the intravenous nutrition of newborn infants that does not contain cysteine. Available evidence does not support routine addition of N‐acetylcysteine to intravenous nutrition of newborn infants containing cysteine.

A systematic review of treatment options for dermal photosensitivity in erythropoietic protoporphyria

This review assessed treatment options for dermal photosensitivity in erythropoietic protoporphyria and concluded that available data were insufficient to prove the efficacy of any treatment options. The authors' assertion that there was insufficient evidence from which to draw any firm conclusions appears to be reliable.

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Summaries for consumers

Supplementary vitamin E, selenium, cysteine and riboflavin for preventing kwashiorkor in preschool children in developing countries

Undernutrition is one of the leading underlying causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Providing antioxidants that would help curb excess free radicals in the body may help prevent the development of kwashiorkor. We identified one cluster‐RCT that attempted to investigate this. Based on the published evidence reviewed, we could draw no firm conclusions of the benefits of supplementary antioxidants for the prevention of kwashiorkor in pre‐school children. There is a need for further research in this area to be certain if antioxidant supplementation can help prevent kwashiorkor in young children.

Cysteine, cystine or N‐acetylcysteine supplementation in parenterally fed neonates

Sick or preterm newborn infants may require intravenous nutrition, including intravenous administration of solutions containing amino acids. Newborn infants need cysteine (an amino acid) for growth under certain conditions. Cysteine may decrease the chance of liver disease and brittle bones. This systemic review was done to analyze whether adding cysteine (or related compounds) to intravenous nutrition affects growth and other outcomes in newborn infants. Five trials studied the effects of adding cysteine to intravenous nutrition that did not contain cysteine. Addition of cysteine significantly improved the babies' ability to build body proteins (analyzed in four studies); however, it did not improve growth (analyzed in one study); no other outcomes were available. One large randomized trial studied the effect of adding another chemical, N‐acetyl‐cysteine, to intravenous nutrition that already contained cysteine. This study showed no benefit and no toxicity of this intervention. We conclude that present data are insufficient to justify routine addition of cysteine to the intravenous nutrition of newborn infants that does not contain cysteine. Available evidence does not support routine addition of N‐acetylcysteine to intravenous nutrition of newborn infants containing cysteine.

No evidence indicates that any of the measures used to protect patients' kidneys during the perioperative period are beneficial

The kidneys may be damaged during an operation as a result of direct and indirect insult. The reasons for this are multiple and include changes to physiology brought on by the surgery and by the body’s response to such insult. Damage to kidneys during the perioperative period is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This updated Cochrane review looked at 72 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 4378 participants (search data until August 2012); interventions most often included pharmacological interventions (administration of dopamine and its analogues, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, N‐acetyl cysteine, atrial natriuretic peptide, sodium bicarbonate, antioxidants and erythropoietin) or selected hydration fluids. We attempted to identify any possible damage to the kidneys by evaluating kidney function up to seven days after the operation.

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