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Cycloserine (By mouth)

Treats tuberculosis (TB). Sometimes used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs).

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Cycloserine belongs to the family of medicines called antibiotics. It is used to treat tuberculosis (TB). When cycloserine is used for TB, it is given with other medicines for TB. Cycloserine may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor. To help clear up your tuberculosis (TB) completely, you must keep taking this medicine for the full time of treatment, even if you begin to… Read more
Brand names include
Seromycin
Drug classes About this
Antitubercular

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

No evidence of the efficacy and safety of D‐cycloserine in the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease

D‐cycloserine is a broad‐spectrum antibiotic formerly used at high doses (500‐1000 mg/day) for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). It has been suggested that D‐cycloserine might improve memory and other cognitive processes through its desired effects on N‐methyl‐D‐aspartate (NMDA) receptor function. It was not possible to extract the results from the first phases of two included crossover studies of D‐cycloserine for Alzheimer's disease and therefore the meta‐analyses are based on the included two parallel group 6‐month studies. The lack of a positive effect of D‐cycloserine on cognitive outcomes in controlled clinical trials with statistical power high enough to detect a clinically meaningful effect means that D‐cycloserine has no place in the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Addition of d‐cycloserine to cognitive and behavioural therapies for the treatment of anxiety and related disorders

Many people suffer from anxiety and related disorders (post‐traumatic stress disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, specific phobia and obsessive compulsive disorder). These disorders are disabling and can affect a person’s ability to function well at work and in social situations. Current treatment options include talking therapies such as cognitive and behavioural therapies. Many patients, however, do not respond as well as hoped to these treatments. Using cognitive and behavioural therapies in combination with certain medicines, for example d‐cycloserine (DCS), is one option that may improve treatment response. In this review we examined the evidence for DCS combined with cognitive behavioural therapies as a treatment for anxiety and related disorders in children, adolescents and adults.

A meta-analysis of D-cycloserine and the facilitation of fear extinction and exposure therapy

BACKGROUND: Translational research suggests that D-cycloserine (DCS), a partial N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist, might facilitate fear extinction and exposure therapy by either enhancing NMDA receptor function during extinction or by reducing NMDA receptor function during fear memory consolidation. This article provides a quantitative review of DCS-augmented fear extinction and exposure therapy literature.

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Summaries for consumers

No evidence of the efficacy and safety of D‐cycloserine in the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease

D‐cycloserine is a broad‐spectrum antibiotic formerly used at high doses (500‐1000 mg/day) for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). It has been suggested that D‐cycloserine might improve memory and other cognitive processes through its desired effects on N‐methyl‐D‐aspartate (NMDA) receptor function. It was not possible to extract the results from the first phases of two included crossover studies of D‐cycloserine for Alzheimer's disease and therefore the meta‐analyses are based on the included two parallel group 6‐month studies. The lack of a positive effect of D‐cycloserine on cognitive outcomes in controlled clinical trials with statistical power high enough to detect a clinically meaningful effect means that D‐cycloserine has no place in the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Addition of d‐cycloserine to cognitive and behavioural therapies for the treatment of anxiety and related disorders

Many people suffer from anxiety and related disorders (post‐traumatic stress disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, specific phobia and obsessive compulsive disorder). These disorders are disabling and can affect a person’s ability to function well at work and in social situations. Current treatment options include talking therapies such as cognitive and behavioural therapies. Many patients, however, do not respond as well as hoped to these treatments. Using cognitive and behavioural therapies in combination with certain medicines, for example d‐cycloserine (DCS), is one option that may improve treatment response. In this review we examined the evidence for DCS combined with cognitive behavioural therapies as a treatment for anxiety and related disorders in children, adolescents and adults.

Glutamatergic drugs for schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disease characterised by positive symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions and negative symptoms such as blunted affect and emotional withdrawal. People with schizophrenia may also suffer from cognitive deficits. Current medication is effective in reducing positive symptoms, but negative and cognitive symptoms are fairly resistant to treatment. Antipsychotic drugs act mainly on the dopamine system in the brain, although other neurotransmitter systems may also play a role in schizophrenia.

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