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Albumin (By injection)

Treats low albumin levels.

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

Brand names include
Albuked 25, Albuked 5, Albumin, Albuminar-25, Albuminar-5, Alburx, Albutein, Buminate, Flexbumin, Kedbumin, Plasbumin-25, Plasbumin-5
Drug classes About this
Volume Expander

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Albumin infusion for low serum albumin in preterm newborn infants

There is a lack of evidence from randomised trials to either support or refute the routine use of albumin infusion for premature babies with a low albumin level. Albumin is a protein that is normally present in the blood. In premature infants, the albumin level in the blood can be low. Albumin is often given to premature babies with a low albumin level. Only two small randomised controlled trials have studied the use of albumin in sick premature babies, and the trials are not big enough or good enough to decide whether giving albumin helps babies in the short or long‐term. Therefore, the question of whether giving albumin does any good and is safe cannot be answered.

Human albumin for hypotension in haemodialysis patients

Intradialytic hypotension (IDH), which is caused by a decrease in blood volume, is a common complication of haemodialysis treatment. It is characterized by a sudden drop in blood pressure with symptoms of nausea, sweating, cramping, or dizziness and causes much discomfort to the patient. IDH is managed by giving fluids to the patient. These can include saline, albumin or other fluids such as gelatins and starches. Because albumin is a relatively rare and expensive blood product, we asked if albumin had an advantage over other fluids to treat IDH. We found one trial comparing albumin to normal saline; no trials were found comparing albumin to other fluids used to treat hypotension. This trial showed no difference between albumin and normal saline in all outcomes except for the amount of additional saline given, which was less in the group treated with albumin. We concluded that normal saline should be the first choice for treating IDH.

Early volume expansion versus inotrope for prevention of morbidity and mortality in very preterm infants

Not enough evidence to show the effect of early volume expansion in very preterm babies. Low blood pressure and blood flow are common in preterm babies and can cause brain injury, organ damage and developmental problems. Increasing the amount of fluid in the blood stream (volume expansion) using albumin or salt solutions may increase the blood pressure and flow of blood. Inotrope drugs such as dopamine are used to increase the heart rate and blood pressure. The review of trials compared early volume expansion with inotropes. The review found dopamine is more effective than albumin at correcting low blood pressure in preterm babies but neither improves outcomes for babies. More research is needed.

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Summaries for consumers

Albumin infusion for low serum albumin in preterm newborn infants

There is a lack of evidence from randomised trials to either support or refute the routine use of albumin infusion for premature babies with a low albumin level. Albumin is a protein that is normally present in the blood. In premature infants, the albumin level in the blood can be low. Albumin is often given to premature babies with a low albumin level. Only two small randomised controlled trials have studied the use of albumin in sick premature babies, and the trials are not big enough or good enough to decide whether giving albumin helps babies in the short or long‐term. Therefore, the question of whether giving albumin does any good and is safe cannot be answered.

Human albumin for hypotension in haemodialysis patients

Intradialytic hypotension (IDH), which is caused by a decrease in blood volume, is a common complication of haemodialysis treatment. It is characterized by a sudden drop in blood pressure with symptoms of nausea, sweating, cramping, or dizziness and causes much discomfort to the patient. IDH is managed by giving fluids to the patient. These can include saline, albumin or other fluids such as gelatins and starches. Because albumin is a relatively rare and expensive blood product, we asked if albumin had an advantage over other fluids to treat IDH. We found one trial comparing albumin to normal saline; no trials were found comparing albumin to other fluids used to treat hypotension. This trial showed no difference between albumin and normal saline in all outcomes except for the amount of additional saline given, which was less in the group treated with albumin. We concluded that normal saline should be the first choice for treating IDH.

Early volume expansion versus inotrope for prevention of morbidity and mortality in very preterm infants

Not enough evidence to show the effect of early volume expansion in very preterm babies. Low blood pressure and blood flow are common in preterm babies and can cause brain injury, organ damage and developmental problems. Increasing the amount of fluid in the blood stream (volume expansion) using albumin or salt solutions may increase the blood pressure and flow of blood. Inotrope drugs such as dopamine are used to increase the heart rate and blood pressure. The review of trials compared early volume expansion with inotropes. The review found dopamine is more effective than albumin at correcting low blood pressure in preterm babies but neither improves outcomes for babies. More research is needed.

See all (47)

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