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Midazolam

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By mouth

Given before surgery or medical procedures to help you feel relaxed or sleepy. Midazolam is used to produce sleepiness or drowsiness and to relieve anxiety… Read more

Brand names include: Versed

Injection

Given before surgery or medical procedures to help you feel relaxed or sleepy. Midazolam is used to produce sleepiness or drowsiness and to relieve anxiety… Read more

Brand names include: Midazolam, Novaplus Midazolam

Drug classes About this
Anesthetic Adjunct, Hypnotic

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

Intravenous midazolam infusion for sedation of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit

There is no evidence to show the benefit of midazolam as a sedative for newborn babies in neonatal intensive care. Newborn babies undergoing uncomfortable procedures in intensive care units may need sedation to reduce stress and avoid complications. It is difficult to measure their pain so sedatives or pain killers are sometimes overlooked for newborn babies. Midazolam is a short‐acting sedative increasingly used in neonatal intensive care. The review of trials found no evidence to support the use of midazolam as a sedative for neonates undergoing intensive care. Babies receiving midazolam stayed in hospital longer and had more adverse effects. More research is needed to address the safety and effect of midazolam.

Dexmedetomidine versus midazolam in anesthetic preoperative administration: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Sun JH, Han N, Wu XY.  Dexmedetomidine versus midazolam in anesthetic preoperative administration: a meta-analysis. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2009; 9(11): 1231-1237

Sedation of children undergoing dental treatment

Fear of the dentist may be expressed as unco‐operative behaviour in children requiring dental treatment. Behaviour management problems can result in a child's tooth decay going untreated. While behavioural techniques play an important role in managing children, some children still find it difficult to co‐operate with dental treatment and may require sedation. This review examined the effectiveness of drugs to sedate a child whilst keeping them conscious. There is some weak evidence that midazolam administered in a drink of juice is effective, and nitrous oxide (laughing gas) may also be effective.

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Summaries for consumers

Intravenous midazolam infusion for sedation of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit

There is no evidence to show the benefit of midazolam as a sedative for newborn babies in neonatal intensive care. Newborn babies undergoing uncomfortable procedures in intensive care units may need sedation to reduce stress and avoid complications. It is difficult to measure their pain so sedatives or pain killers are sometimes overlooked for newborn babies. Midazolam is a short‐acting sedative increasingly used in neonatal intensive care. The review of trials found no evidence to support the use of midazolam as a sedative for neonates undergoing intensive care. Babies receiving midazolam stayed in hospital longer and had more adverse effects. More research is needed to address the safety and effect of midazolam.

Sedation of children undergoing dental treatment

Fear of the dentist may be expressed as unco‐operative behaviour in children requiring dental treatment. Behaviour management problems can result in a child's tooth decay going untreated. While behavioural techniques play an important role in managing children, some children still find it difficult to co‐operate with dental treatment and may require sedation. This review examined the effectiveness of drugs to sedate a child whilst keeping them conscious. There is some weak evidence that midazolam administered in a drink of juice is effective, and nitrous oxide (laughing gas) may also be effective.

What is the best sedative technique for patients undergoing endoscopic cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)?

Patients have to be given medicines to make them adequately drowsy (sedated) or unconscious (anaesthetized) to tolerate the ERCP procedure. These medicines may be administered by anaesthetic or non‐anaesthetic healthcare personnel, and there is currently some debate as to who should administer these drugs to patients for ERCP procedures.

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