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Ibuprofen

What works?

Learn more about the effects of these drugs. The most reliable research is summed up for you in our featured article.

By mouth

Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat mild to moderate pain, and helps to relieve symptoms of arthritis (osteoarthritis,… Read more

Brand names include: A-G Profen, Actiprofen

By injection

Ibuprofen injection is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used alone or together with other medicines (eg, opioid analgesics) to relieve… Read more

Brand names include: Caldolor, Neoprofen

Drug classes About this
Analgesic, Antimigraine, Antirheumatic, Central Nervous System Agent, Musculoskeletal Agent
Combinations including this drug

What works? Research summarized

Evidence reviews

A single dose of ibuprofen administered orally to treat acute postoperative pain in adults

Ibuprofen at 200 mg and 400 mg produces a high level of pain relief in about half of those with moderate or severe acute postoperative pain. This is a good result compared with most other analgesics tested in a very well researched model of pain used for demonstrating that drugs can actually produce pain relief. There were no more adverse events than with placebo.

No evidence of benefit of Ibuprofen for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

There is increasing interest in non‐steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Extensive epidemiological surveys have suggested a lower prevalence of cognitive impairment in patients receiving long term treatment with NSAIDs. Animal and cell culture studies have produced evidence that inflammatory processes may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. As a result, agents such as ibuprofen have been proposed for the treatment of people with AD. Although ibuprofen is better tolerated overall than some other NSAIDs, such as indomethacin, no randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of this drug for treatment of people with AD have been published. One such a trial is underway. The use of ibuprofen for the treatment of AD cannot at present be recommended.

Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants

PDA is a common complication for very preterm (premature) or very small babies. PDA is an open vessel that channels blood from the lungs to the body. It should close after birth, but sometimes remains open because of the baby's premature stage of development. PDA can lead to life‐threatening complications. Indomethacin is successful in causing PDA closure, but can cause serious adverse effects. Another option is the drug ibuprofen, which can be given to try and prevent PDA. This updated review of trials found that ibuprofen can prevent PDA, but does not confer any other short‐term or long‐term benefits.

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Summaries for consumers

A single dose of ibuprofen administered orally to treat acute postoperative pain in adults

Ibuprofen at 200 mg and 400 mg produces a high level of pain relief in about half of those with moderate or severe acute postoperative pain. This is a good result compared with most other analgesics tested in a very well researched model of pain used for demonstrating that drugs can actually produce pain relief. There were no more adverse events than with placebo.

No evidence of benefit of Ibuprofen for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

There is increasing interest in non‐steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Extensive epidemiological surveys have suggested a lower prevalence of cognitive impairment in patients receiving long term treatment with NSAIDs. Animal and cell culture studies have produced evidence that inflammatory processes may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. As a result, agents such as ibuprofen have been proposed for the treatment of people with AD. Although ibuprofen is better tolerated overall than some other NSAIDs, such as indomethacin, no randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of this drug for treatment of people with AD have been published. One such a trial is underway. The use of ibuprofen for the treatment of AD cannot at present be recommended.

Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants

PDA is a common complication for very preterm (premature) or very small babies. PDA is an open vessel that channels blood from the lungs to the body. It should close after birth, but sometimes remains open because of the baby's premature stage of development. PDA can lead to life‐threatening complications. Indomethacin is successful in causing PDA closure, but can cause serious adverse effects. Another option is the drug ibuprofen, which can be given to try and prevent PDA. This updated review of trials found that ibuprofen can prevent PDA, but does not confer any other short‐term or long‐term benefits.

See all (139)

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