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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

The effectiveness and safety of moxibustion for treating cancer-related fatigue: a systematic review and meta-analyses

Review published: 2014.

Bibliographic details: Lee S, Jerng UM, Liu Y, Kang JW, Nam D, Lee JD.  The effectiveness and safety of moxibustion for treating cancer-related fatigue: a systematic review and meta-analyses. Supportive Care in Cancer 2014; 22(5): 1429-1440. [PubMed: 24609979]

Abstract

PURPOSE: Among cancer patients, cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common symptoms and adversely affects physical ability and quality of life even several years after treatment. This study aims to evaluate the current evidence for moxibustion in patients with CRF.

METHODS: Eighteen databases were searched from their inception to April 2013. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moxibustion for treating CRF without language restriction were considered for inclusion. The risk of bias and reporting quality of each study were assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT), and Revised Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA). Risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) was used to measure the treatment effect with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) in a random effects model.

RESULTS: Four RCTs with a total of 374 subjects were included for the review. These four studies compared moxibustion plus routine care with routine care alone. Most studies were determined to have a moderate to high risk of bias with low reporting quality. An indirect moxa stick was used in two studies, an indirect ginger cake-separated moxa was used in one study, and in one remaining study, both moxibustion methods were used. Meta-analysis showed the favorable effects of moxibustion on the response rate (RR, 1.73; 95 % CI, 1.29 to 2.32; p=.0003; heterogeneity, I (2)=15 %, p=.32). Burning with a mild blister after moxibustion was reported in one study.

CONCLUSIONS: Because of a high risk of bias and low reporting quality of the studies included in this review, it is difficult to draw the conclusion that moxibustion is an effective and safe treatment for patients with CRF. Further rigorous research will be necessary to evaluate whether moxibustion has beneficial effects on CRF.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO. Unique identifier: CRD42013004501.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 24609979

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