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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Dexamethasone for preventing postoperative sore throat: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Review published: 2013.

Bibliographic details: Sun L, Guo R, Sun L.  Dexamethasone for preventing postoperative sore throat: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Irish Journal of Medical Science 2013: epub. [PubMed: 24357270]

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Postoperative sore throat (POST) is a common complication following tracheal intubation. The effectiveness of prophylactic dexamethasone on POST needs further elucidation.

AIMS: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of intravenous dexamethasone for the prevention of POST in patients undergoing endotracheal intubation.

METHODS: Studies were identified by literature searches of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane database. Systematic review was performed by two independent investigators.

RESULTS: We summarized 7 RCTs including 727 participants. Intravenous dexamethasone significantly reduced the risk of POST at 24 h [pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.676; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.494-0.925; P = 0.014; heterogeneity test, I (2) = 45.8 %], as well as alleviating its severity [standardized mean difference (SMD) = -1.15; 95 % CI -1.86 to -0.45; P = 0.002; heterogeneity test, I (2) = 91.7 %]. Further sub-group analysis indicated a significant relationship between dexamethasone and reduced risk of POST when its dose was over 0.1 mg/kg. No severe adverse effects were reported.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that intravenous dexamethasone reduces the risk and severity of POST from intubation at 24 h. The effective dosage of dexamethasone for preventing the risk of POST appeared to be over 0.1 mg/kg.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 24357270

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