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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

XRCC1 polymorphisms and cervical cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis

Review published: 2014.

Bibliographic details: Mei J, Duan HX, Wang LL, Yang S, Lu JQ, Shi TY, Zhao Y.  XRCC1 polymorphisms and cervical cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis. Tumor Biology 2014; 35(2): 1221-1231. [PubMed: 24057881]

Abstract

X-ray repair cross complementing 1 (XRCC1) plays a key role in DNA repair, genetic instability and tumorigenesis. A series of epidemiological studies have examined associations between XRCC1 polymorphisms and cervical cancer risk, but the findings remain inconclusive. We searched three electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE and CNKI) for studies on the association between XRCC1 polymorphisms and cervical cancer risk published before June 2013. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) were calculated to estimate risk associations. A total of 28 case-control studies from 15 publications with 5,890 cervical cancer cases and 7,626 controls were identified. There was a significant association between rs25487 and cervical cancer risk in Asian populations (Dominant model: OR = 1.25, 95 % CI =1.04-1.50, P = 0.051 for heterogeneity test). After excluding three studies deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, we observed a significant association of rs1799782 with cervical cancer risk in all populations and in Asian populations (Recessive model: OR = 1.62 and 1.72, 95 % CI = 1.22-2.14 and 1.29-2.30, P = 0.090 and 0.266 for heterogeneity test, respectively). However, there was no significant association between rs25489 and cervical cancer risk. These findings were further confirmed by false-positive report probability analysis. No publication bias was found by using the funnel plot and Egger's test. This meta-analysis provides strongly statistical evidence for the association between rs1799782 and cervical cancer risk, as well as its association with rs25487 only in Asian populations. However, single large, well-designed prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 24057881

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