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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Systematic review of laparoscopy-assisted versus open gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer

Review published: 2013.

Bibliographic details: Ye LY, Liu DR, Li C, Li XW, Huang LN, Ye S, Zheng YX, Chen L.  Systematic review of laparoscopy-assisted versus open gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer. Journal of Zhejiang University. SCIENCE B 2013; 14(6): 468-478. [PMC free article: PMC3682162] [PubMed: 23733423]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The study compared laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) with open gastrectomy (OG) in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC).

METHODS: Literature search was performed in the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases to identify control studies that compared LAG and OG for AGC. A meta-analysis was conducted to examine the surgical safety and oncologic adequacy, using the random-effect model.

RESULTS: Seven eligible studies including 815 patients were analyzed. LAG was associated with less blood loss, less use of analgesics, shorter time of flatus and periods of hospital stay, but longer time of operation. The incidence of most complications was similar between the two groups. However, LAG was associated with a lower rate of pulmonary infection (odds ratio (OR) 0.19; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05 to 0.68; P<0.05). No significant differences were noted in terms of the number of harvested lymph nodes (weighted mean difference (WMD) 1.165; 95% CI -2.000 to 4.311; P>0.05), overall mortality (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.39 to 1.10; P>0.05), cancer-related mortality (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.32 to 1.25; P>0.05), or recurrence (OR 0.62; 95% CI 0.33 to 1.16; P>0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: LAG could be performed safely for AGC with adequate lymphadenectomy and has several short-term advantages compared with conventional OG. No differences were found in long-term outcomes. However, these results should be validated in large randomized controlled studies (RCTs) with sufficient follow-up.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 23733423

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