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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews.

Obesity and surgical site infections risk in orthopedics: a meta-analysis

Review published: 2013.

Bibliographic details: Yuan K, Chen HL.  Obesity and surgical site infections risk in orthopedics: a meta-analysis. International Journal of Surgery 2013; 11(5): 383-388. [PubMed: 23470598]

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this meta-analysis is to assess the association between obesity and risk of surgical site infections (SSI) risk in orthopedics.

METHODS: We searched the electronic database of PubMed and Web of Science for observational studies about risk factors for SSI risk in orthopedics, meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI) between infection group and no infection group, infection rate in obesity expose and no obesity expose were conducted, respectively.

RESULTS: A total of 20 studies included in the meta-analysis. The pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) of BMI between infection group and no infection group was 0.329 (95% CI 0.215-0.444), which was statistically significant (z = 5.65, p = 0.000). The pooled relative risk (RR) of infection rate compare obesity expose with no obesity expose was 1.915 (95% CI 1.530-2.396), which was statistically significant (z = 5.68, p = 0.000). No publication bias was found (Begg test P = 0.174 and Egger test P = 0.345) in pooled WMD of BMI. But there was significant publication bias in pooled RR of infection rate (Begg test P = 0.001 and Egger test P = 0.001).

CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis indicates that obesity had about twofold increased risk of surgical site infections risk in orthopedics. However, this conclusion should be verified by further well designed prospective cohort studies.

Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2013 University of York.

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