Home > Search Results

Results: 1

Making Health Care Safer II: An Updated Critical Analysis of the Evidence for Patient Safety Practices

Making Health Care Safer II: An Updated Critical Analysis of the Evidence for Patient Safety Practices

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US)

Version: March 2013

Preventing In-Facility Delirium

Delirium (also known as acute confusional state) refers to an acute decline in attention and cognition that constitutes a serious problem for older hospitalized patients and long-term care residents. Estimated hospital occurrence rates have ranged from 14% to 56% and vary depending upon reason for hospitalization (e.g., urgent surgery, intensive care, general medical admission) and the patient's risk of developing delirium. Development of delirium is associated with an increased risk of mortality, postoperative complications, longer hospital and intensive care unit stays, and functional decline., In addition, delirium presents a significant burden in terms of short and long-term health care costs. A study of 841 patients (age ≥70 years) admitted to non-intensive care general medical units over a three year period at Yale-New Haven hospital found that costs per day were more than 2.5 times higher for patients with delirium compared with those without delirium. The total cost estimates associated with delirium ranged from $16,303 to $64,421 per patient, which the authors extrapolated to national costs ranging from $38 billion to $152 billion each year. As these cost estimates were based on data from 1995-1998, the costs of delirium today would be even higher. Accordingly, prevention of delirium is extremely important both for improving patient outcomes and for lowering health care costs.

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...