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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Linear-stapled versus circular-stapled laparoscopic gastrojejunal anastomosis in morbid obesity: meta-analysis

Review published: 2012.

Bibliographic details: Penna M, Markar SR, Venkat-Raman V, Karthikesalingam A, Hashemi M.  Linear-stapled versus circular-stapled laparoscopic gastrojejunal anastomosis in morbid obesity: meta-analysis. Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques 2012; 22(2): 95-101. [PubMed: 22487619]

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The study aims to provide a pooled analysis of individual small trials comparing linear-stapled versus circular-stapled laparoscopic gastrojejunal (GJ) anastomosis in morbid obesity surgery.

METHODS: A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library databases was performed. Primary outcomes were GJ leak and stricture. Secondary outcomes were operative time, length of hospital stay, postoperative bleeding, wound infection, marginal ulcers, and estimated weight loss. Pooled odds ratios were calculated for categorical outcomes and weighted mean differences for continuous outcomes.

RESULTS: Nine trials were included comprising 9374 patients (2946 linear vs. 6428 circular). Primary outcome analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in the rate of GJ stricture associated with circular-stapled anastomosis. A significantly reduced rate of wound infection, bleeding, and operative time associated with linear stapling was also found. No significant differences appeared for the other outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS: This pooled analysis recommends the preferential use of the linear stapling technique over circular stapling.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 22487619

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