Home > Search Results
  • We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 7

Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Adults [Internet]

Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Adults [Internet]

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US)

Version: November 2012

Discussion

The evidence reviewed in this study is summarized in Table 12. The specific domain scores used to determine the overall strength of evidence for each body of evidence are shown in Appendix G.

Executive Summary

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common chronic bloodborne pathogen in the United States. HCV is primarily acquired by large or repeated percutaneous exposures to blood, with injection drug use being the strongest risk factor. Based on a national survey of households, approximately 1.6 percent of U.S. adults over 20 years of age have antibodies to HCV, indicating prior acute HCV infection. About 78 percent of patients with acute HCV infection develop chronic HCV infection, defined by the presence of persistent viremia.

Results

The search and selection of articles are summarized in the study flow diagram (Figure 2). Of the 1,096 citations identified at the title and abstract level in the original search, 215 articles met inclusion criteria and were selected for further review of the full text. From updated searches and peer reviewer suggested citations, an additional 2,352 citations were identified, and 164 of these met inclusion criteria and were selected for full-text review. Of the 379 articles reviewed at the full-text level, a total of 90 studies met inclusion criteria.

Introduction

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common chronic bloodborne pathogen in the United States. HCV is primarily acquired by large or repeated percutaneous exposures to blood, with injection drug use the strongest risk factor. Based on a national survey of households, approximately 1.6 percent of U.S. adults over 20 years of age have antibodies to HCV, indicating prior acute HCV infection. About 78 percent of patients with acute HCV infection develop chronic HCV infection, defined by the presence of persistent viremia.

Methods

The topic of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment was nominated for a comparative effectiveness review (CER) in a public process. The Key Questions were proposed in the public nomination process and developed by investigators from the Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) with input from expert Key Informants (KI), who helped to refine Key Questions, identify important methodological and clinical issues, and define parameters for the review of evidence. The revised Key Questions were then posted to a public Web site for comment. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the EPC agreed upon the final Key Questions after reviewing the public comments and receiving additional input from a Technical Expert Panel (TEP) convened for this report. We then drafted a protocol for this CER, which was reviewed by the TEP and is available on the AHRQ Web site where it was posted in November 2011: www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/index.cfm/search-for-guides-reviews-and-reports/?pageaction=displayproduct&productid=855.

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...