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KEY CLINICAL QUESTION 3

DetailsNotes and status
Review question 3When should colonoscopic surveillance be started and what should be the frequency of surveillance?
Objective(s)To determine when surveillance should be started and how frequently should it be done for the techniques.
Criteria for considering studiesPICO
PopulationAdults with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's colitis/disease and polyps (including adenomas) in the colon or rectum.
Intervention(s)Colonoscopic surveillance using: To be modified during consultation – remove colonoscopic surveillance terms and insert prognostic studies filter.
Comparator(s) To be modified during consultation – remove colonoscopic surveillance terms and insert prognostic studies filter.
Outcome(s)
z.

Factors including: extent and duration of disease, size, number, site and type of polyps/lesions.

aa.

Progression to colorectal cancer and stage at presentation.

bb.

Overall mortality and survival.

How to be searchedAs per the Guidelines Manual. No additional databases are required.
Date restriction: none.
Language restriction: English language.
Study design: no study filter.
Review strategyGRADE profiles

From: Appendix 2, Review questions and review protocol

Cover of Colonoscopic Surveillance for Prevention of Colorectal Cancer in People with Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease or Adenomas
Colonoscopic Surveillance for Prevention of Colorectal Cancer in People with Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease or Adenomas.
NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 118.
Centre for Clinical Practice at NICE (UK).
Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

All rights reserved. This material may be freely reproduced for educational and not-for-profit purposes. No reproduction by or for commercial organisations, or for commercial purposes, is allowed without the express written permission of NICE.

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