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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Imaging technologies for high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a systematic review

Review published: 2011.

Bibliographic details: D'Souza D, Baldassarre F, Morton G, Falkson C, Batchelar D.  Imaging technologies for high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a systematic review. Clinical Oncology 2011; 23(7): 460-475. [PubMed: 21441017]

Abstract

The aim of this overview was to assess the utility of various imaging technologies (fluoroscopy, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography) for the treatment planning of high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Reviews and primary studies comparing different imaging technologies used during high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer and published from 1988 to 2008 were sought by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE databases, the Cochrane Library, personal files and reference lists of identified studies, and by contacting experts. Study selection, study quality assessment and data extraction were carried out in duplicate. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. No systematic reviews or randomised controlled studies (RCTs) were located. The validity assessment revealed that the quality of the existing studies is very variable. This is the first systematic review in the area of imaging technologies for cervix brachytherapy. No RCTs have been located and it is possible that an RCT is not the optimal methodology to assess imaging technologies. However, in this area there is a need for more prospective studies and for studies that consider the expertise of the operators in their design. The studies found supported the use of three-dimensional imaging as opposed to the traditional two-dimensional imaging. However, apart from the effectiveness of visualising tumours and surrounding tissues, the utility of imaging technologies in clinical practice is determined by other contextual factors, such as their availability, accessibility and ease of use.

Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 21441017

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