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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

The science of intervention development for type 1 diabetes in childhood: systematic review

Review published: 2010.

Bibliographic details: Savage E, Farrell D, McManus V, Grey M.  The science of intervention development for type 1 diabetes in childhood: systematic review. Journal of Advanced Nursing 2010; 66(12): 2604-2619. [PubMed: 20735504]

Abstract

AIM: This paper is a report of a review of the science of intervention development for type 1 diabetes in childhood and its implications for improving health outcomes in children, adolescents, and/or their families.

BACKGROUND: Previous reviewers have identified insufficient evidence to support the application of effective interventions for type 1 diabetes in clinical practice. The need for quality randomized controlled trials to address shortcomings in previous study designs has been highlighted as a priority for future intervention research. However, there is also a need to consider the scientific development of interventions, which to date has received little attention.

DATA SOURCE: A search for published randomized controlled trials over 5 years (2004-2008) was conducted in electronic databases (Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Psychinfo, ERIC). Reference lists of papers identified from electronic searches were examined for additional papers.

METHODS: A systematic review was conducted. Studies were included if (i) an intervention for managing any aspect of type 1 diabetes was implemented, (ii) children, adolescents and/or their families were sampled, (iii) a randomized controlled trial, (iv) published in English.

RESULTS: Fourteen randomized controlled trials were reviewed on education (n = 7), psychosocial (n = 5) and family therapy (n = 2) interventions. Compared to education interventions, family therapy and most psychosocial interventions were developed with greater scientific rigour, and demonstrated promising effects on more health outcomes measured.

CONCLUSION: Interventions developed within clearly-defined scientific criteria offer potential for improving health outcomes in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their families. Future reviews on interventions for type 1 diabetes in childhood need to include criteria for assessing the science of intervention development.

© 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 20735504

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