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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews.

The efficacy of oral irrigation in addition to a toothbrush on plaque and the clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation: a systematic review

Review published: 2008.

Bibliographic details: Husseini A, Slot D E, Van der Weijden G A.  The efficacy of oral irrigation in addition to a toothbrush on plaque and the clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation: a systematic review. International Journal of Dental Hygiene 2008; 6(4): 304-314. [PubMed: 19138181]

Quality assessment

This review concluded that oral water irrigation did not appear to have a beneficial effect on reducing plaque scores, although there was evidence to favour irrigation over regular oral hygiene in terms of improved gingival health. These conclusions would appear reliable given the evidence presented, but there may be relevant evidence that was missed by this review. Full critical summary

Abstract

AIM: The aim of this review was to systematically review the literature on the adjunctive effect of oral irrigation in addition to toothbrushing on plaque and clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Papers in the MEDLINE-PubMed and Cochrane Central register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases up to January 2008 were searched to identify appropriate studies. Clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation such as plaque, bleeding, gingivitis and pocket depth, were selected as outcome variables.

RESULTS: Independent screening of the titles and abstracts of 809 PubMed and 105 Cochrane papers resulted in seven publications that met the eligibility criteria. Mean values and standard deviations were collected by data extraction. Descriptive comparisons with brushing alone or regular oral hygiene are presented.

CONCLUSION: As an adjunct to brushing, the oral irrigator does not have a beneficial effect in reducing visible plaque. However, there is a positive trend in favour of oral irrigation improving gingival health over regular oral hygiene or toothbrushing only.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

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