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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews.

Compound salvia pellet, a traditional Chinese medicine, for the treatment of chronic stable angina pectoris compared with nitrates: a meta-analysis

Review published: 2006.

Bibliographic details: Wang G, Wang L, Xiong Z Y, Mao B, Li T Q.  Compound salvia pellet, a traditional Chinese medicine, for the treatment of chronic stable angina pectoris compared with nitrates: a meta-analysis. Medical Science. Monitor 2006; 12(1): SR1-SR7. [PubMed: 16369479]

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Compound salvia pellet (CSP), consisting of active herbal ingredients extracted from Danshen (salvia miltiorrhiza), Sanqi (panax notoginseng), and Borneol (Cinnamomum camphora), is taken most frequently by patients with angina pectoris in China. To determine the efficacy and safety of CSP for the treatment of stable angina pectoris (SAP), a meta-analysis was undertaken.

MATERIAL/METHODS: An extensive search including MEDLINE, EMBASE, BA, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), and Chinese Cochrane Centre Controlled Trials Register from 1994 to 2004 was performed. Data were extracted independently from the included trials by two reviewers. Statistical software (RevMan 4.1) provided by the Cochrane Collaboration was applied.

RESULTS: Twenty-seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (n=3722), regardless of language or publication status, were identified. Generally, the methodological quality of the trials, assessed by the Jadad scale, was low, except for one with 3 points. Statistical pooling of the results showed that, compared with nitrates, CSP treatment had significant effect on the improvement of angina symptoms (RR=1.13, 95%CI=[1.07, 1.20]), showed greater increased effect on the improvement of electrocardiogram (ECG) results (RR=1.39, 95%CI=[1.28, 1.50]), and the percentage of patients with adverse events was significantly decreased in the treatment of CSP in comparison with nitrates (2.4% vs. 29.7%).

CONCLUSIONS: CSP has significant effect on the improvement of angina symptoms and ECG results with few adverse events. However, the methodological quality of clinical trials with CSP for SAP needs to be improved, and the outcome measures should include mortality, quality of life, and other end-points.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

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