Home > DARE Reviews > Psychotherapy in long-term care: a review

PubMed Health. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Psychotherapy in long-term care: a review

Review published: 2006.

Bibliographic details: Bharucha A J, Dew M A, Miller M D, Borson S, Reynolds C.  Psychotherapy in long-term care: a review. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association 2006; 7(9): 568-580. [PubMed: 17095422]

Abstract

Psychological distress in long-term care (LTC) settings is highly prevalent and crosses many conventional psychiatric diagnostic boundaries. Mental health professionals who consult in LTC facilities have experienced firsthand the impact of a variety of nonpharmacological therapeutic approaches on individual residents, yet these are rarely investigated in a systematic fashion, and even less commonly reported in the literature. The present report summarizes the state-of-evidence of "talk therapies" for depression and psychological well-being in LTC facilities by reviewing controlled trials of psychotherapy for LTC residents published in English-language peer-reviewed journals. We excluded studies of nonpharmacological approaches designed primarily to curb behavioral disturbances of dementia, and those psychosocial interventions using an approach other than "talk therapy" in individual or group format since they have been reviewed in detail elsewhere. A majority of the 18 studies that met our inclusion criteria reported significant short- and, in some cases, longer-term benefits on instruments measuring depression, hopelessness, self-esteem, perceived control, and a host of other psychological variables. However, these findings must be interpreted within the severe methodological limitations of many studies, including small sample sizes, variable study entry criteria, short duration of trials, heterogeneous outcome assessment methods, and lack of detail on intervention methods. Nevertheless, the positive efficacy of these approaches, when understood within the framework of potential serious complications of pharmacotherapy for frail elders with multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy, and a narrow therapeutic index, suggests a strong need for methodologically rigorous trials of psychotherapy in the LTC setting, especially in combination with pharmacotherapy.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 17095422

PubMed Health Blog...

read all...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...