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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews.

Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment in women with breast cancer: a critique of the literature

Review published: 2005.

Bibliographic details: Jansen C E, Miaskowski C, Dodd M, Dowling G.  Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment in women with breast cancer: a critique of the literature. Oncology Nursing Forum 2005; 32(2): 329-342. [PubMed: 15759070]

Quality assessment

This review investigated chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment in women with breast cancer. The authors concluded that although the data suggest that chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairments occur, the evidence is limited and further studies are required. The authors' cautious conclusions seem appropriate. However, it is unclear whether the same results would have been obtained had a more comprehensive search strategy been used. Full critical summary

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To review and critique the studies that have investigated chemotherapy-induced impairments in cognitive function in women with breast cancer.

DATA SOURCES: Published research articles and textbooks.

DATA SYNTHESIS: Although studies of breast cancer survivors have found chemotherapy-induced impairments in multiple domains of cognitive function, they are beset with conceptual and methodologic problems. Findings regarding cognitive deficits in women with breast cancer who currently are receiving chemotherapy are even less clear.

CONCLUSIONS: Although data from published studies suggest that chemotherapy-induced impairments in cognitive function do occur in some women with breast cancer, differences in time since treatment, chemotherapy regimen, menopausal status, and neuropsychological tests used limit comparisons among the various studies. Further studies need to be done before definitive conclusions can be made.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: The potential for chemotherapy-induced impairments in cognitive function may influence patients' ability to give informed consent, identify treatment toxicities, learn self-care measures, and perform self-care behaviors.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2012 University of York.

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