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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

Evidenzbasierte Armrehabilitation: eine systematische Literaurubersicht [Evidence-based arm rehabilitation: a systematic review of the literature]

Review published: 2003.

Bibliographic details: Platz T.  Evidenzbasierte Armrehabilitation: eine systematische Literaurubersicht [Evidence-based arm rehabilitation: a systematic review of the literature]. Der Nervenarzt 2003; 74(10): 841-849. [PubMed: 14551687]

Abstract

Based on a systematic MEDLINE search and informal sources, 40 references were identified that evaluate training therapy or neuromuscular electric stimulation for arm paresis after stroke and describe either a systematic review, meta-analysis, randomised controlled trial, or controlled cohort study. The evidence was grouped into three areas of interest: comparison of physiotherapy schools, effects of intensity of training, and efficacy of specific arm rehabilitation techniques. The only physiotherapy school with evidence of superior efficacy was the task-oriented 'motor relearning programme'. Higher intensities of motor rehabilitation can accelerate motor recovery. Various training techniques with demonstrated efficacy are available for specific patient subgroups: arm ability training for mildly affected patients with reduced efficiency of motor control, constrained-induced movement therapy for patients with partial functional deficits and learned nonuse of the affected arm, and repetitive sensorimotor training techniques, EMG-biofeedback, functional electrical stimulation, and robot-assisted training for patients with severe arm paresis.

CRD has determined that this article meets the DARE scientific quality criteria for a systematic review.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.

PMID: 14551687

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