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A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): A.D.A.M.; 2013.

A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia.

Minimally invasive hip replacement

Small incision total hip replacement; MIS hip surgery

Last reviewed: August 12, 2013.

Minimally invasive hip replacement is a technique used to perform hip replacement surgeries. It uses a smaller surgical cut, and fewer muscles around the hip are cut or detached.

Description

To perform this surgery:

  • A cut will be made in one of three places -- on the back of the hip (over the buttock), on the front of the hip (near the groin), or on the side of the hip.
  • In most cases, the cut will be 3 - 6 inches long. In a regular hip replacement surgery, the cut is 10 - 12 inches long.
  • The surgeon will use special instruments to work through the small cut.
  • Surgery involves cutting and removing bone. The surgeon will remove some muscles and other tissues. Less tissue is removed than in regular surgery. Most of the time, muscles are not cut or detached.

This procedure uses the same type of hip replacement implants as regular surgery.

Why the Procedure Is Performed

As in regular surgery, this procedure is done to replace or repair a diseased or damaged hip joint. This technique works better for patients who are younger and thinner. Minimally invasive techniques may allow for a quicker recovery and less pain.

Talk with your surgeon about the benefits and risks. Ask if your surgeon has experience with this type of surgery.

After the Procedure

There is often less blood loss and pain with this technique than with open surgery. People who have this surgery often have a shorter stay in the hospital and faster recovery. Ask your doctor if this procedure is a good choice for you.

References

  1. Meneghini RM, Smits SA, Swinford RR, Bahamonde RE. A randomized, prospective study of 3 minimally invasive surgical approaches in total hip arthroplasty: comprehensive gait analysis. J Arthroplasty. 2008;23:68-73. [PubMed: 18722305]
  2. Harkess JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of the hip. In: Canale ST, Beatty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2012:chap 3.

Review Date: 8/12/2013.

Reviewed by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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