Table 10.6HbA1c outcomes

ComparisonStudyChange in HbA1c %
Rosiglitazone vs repaglinide vs repaglinide & rosiglitazoneOne study125
N=252
1+
Greater reduction for combination therapy (−1.43%) than for repaglinide monotherapy (−0.17%) or rosiglitazone (−0.56%) (p<0.001 for combination vs either monotherapy). p≤0.001 for combination vs either monotherapy
Rosiglitazone vs glibenclamideOne study128
N=203
1
Comparable at endpoint*
One study129
N=598
1+
NS
Rosiglitazone vs glibenclamide vs metforminOne study54
N=4,360
After 6 months, the rate of increase in HbA1c was greatest in the glibenclamide group, which had annual increases of 0.24%, intermediate in the metformin group, which had annual increases of 0.14%; and least in the rosiglitazone group, which had increases of 0.07%, (p<0.001)
Rosiglitazone + sulfonylurea vs placebo + sulfonylureaOne study124
N=227
1+
The HbA1c reduction with RSG + SU was significantly different from uptitrated SU alone (−0.79%, p<0.0001)
Rosiglitazone + sulfonylurea vs sulfonylureaOne study127
N=348
1+
The RSG and SU group showed a decrease in HbA1c 9.1% to 7.9%, mean change −1.1, 95% CI −1.37 to −0.89, from baseline. HbA1c increased slightly in the control group. The difference between the treatment groups was significant, (p=0.0001)
Rosiglitazone + gliclazide vs gliclazide uptitrationOne study132
N=471
1+
HbA1c was reduced by ≥0.7% 65% of patients in the combination treatment group compared to 21% in the uptitrated gliclazide group, (p<0.0001)
Rosiglitazone + glibenclamide vs glibenclamide uptitrationOne study130
N=340
1+
Combination therapy reduced HbA1c by 0.81% compared with glibenclamide monotherapy, (p<0.0001)
Rosiglitazone + metformin vs glimepiride + metforminOne study131
N=95
1+
NS
One study123
N=99
1+
NS
Rosiglitazone + metformin vs glibenclamide + metforminOne study126
N=389
1+
NS
Rosiglitazone + metformin or sulfonylurea vs metformin + sulfonylureaOne study136
N=1,122
1+
NS
Rosiglitazone + sulfonylurea + metformin vs insulin glargine + sulfonylurea + metforminOne study139
N=217
1+
Improvements from baseline were similar in both groups (−1.66% vs −1.51% for glargine and rosiglitazone respectively) with no significant difference between the groups, (p=0.14) In patients with HbA1c glargine resulted in significantly greater A1C reduction compared with rosiglitazone, (p<0.05)
Insulin glargine + sulfonylurea + metformin vs rosiglitazone + sulfonylurea + metforminOne study140NS
Rosiglitazone/metformin (FDC) vs metformin uptitratedOne study62
N=569
1++
The treatment difference was −0.22% (95% CI −0.36 to −0.09, p=0.001) in favour of the FDC
Rosiglitazone/metformin (FDC) vs metformin monotherapyOne study135
N=526
At week 32 there was a reduction from baseline in mean HbA1c in the RSG/MET group from 7.2±0.6 to 6.7±0.8% compared with 7.2±0.6 to 6.8±0.9% in the MET group, (p=0.0357)
Rosiglitazone/metformin (FDC) vs rosiglitazone vs metforminOne study134
N=468
1+
At week 32, reductions in HbA1c were observed in all the treatment groups. The greatest mean reduction, 2.3%, was observed in the RSG/MET group from a baseline of 8.9±1.1% to 6.6±1.0% at study end. This reduction was significantly greater when compared with the 1.8% reduction in the MET group (p=0.0008) and 1.6% in the RSG group (p<0.0001)
Metformin + pioglitazone 15 mg OD vs metformin + rosiglitazone 4 mg ODOne study133
N=96
1+
NS
*

Significance tests not performed

MET, metformin; RSG, rosiglitazone; SU, sulfonylurea

From: 10, Oral glucose control therapies (2): other oral agents and exenatide

Cover of Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 Diabetes: National Clinical Guideline for Management in Primary and Secondary Care (Update).
NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 66.
National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).
Copyright © 2008, Royal College of Physicians of London.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form (including photocopying or storing it in any medium by electronic means and whether or not transiently or incidentally to some other use of this publication) without the written permission of the copyright owner. Applications for the copyright owner’s written permission to reproduce any part of this publication should be addressed to the publisher.

PubMed Health. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.