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A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): A.D.A.M.; 2013.

A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia.

Congenital toxoplasmosis

Last reviewed: June 9, 2013.

Congenital toxoplasmosis is a group of symptoms that occur when an unborn baby (fetus) is infected with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

Causes

Toxoplasmosis infection can be passed to a developing baby if the mother becomes infected while pregnant. The infection spreads to the developing baby across the placenta. Most of the time, the infection is mild in the mother. The woman may not be aware she has the parasite. However, infection of the developing baby can cause serious problems. Problems are worse if the infection occurs in early pregnancy.

Symptoms

Up to half babies who become infected with toxoplasmosis during the pregnancy are born early (prematurely). The infection can damage the baby's eyes, nervous system, skin, and ears.

Often, there are signs of infection at birth. However, babies with mild infections may not have symptoms for months or years after birth. If not treated, most children with this infection develop problems in their teens. Eye problems are common.

Symptoms may include:

Brain and nervous system damage ranges from very mild to severe, and may include:

Exams and Tests

The health care provider will examine the baby. The baby may have:

Tests that may be done during pregnancy include:

After birth, the following tests may be done on the baby:

  • Antibody studies on cord blood and cerebrospinal fluid
  • CT scan of the brain
  • MRI scan of the brain
  • Neurological exams
  • Standard eye exam
  • Toxoplasmosis test

Treatment

Spiramycin can treat infection in the pregnant mother.

Pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine can treat fetal infection (diagnosed during the pregnancy).

Treatment of infants with congenital toxoplasmosis most often includes pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and leucovorin for one year. Infants are also sometimes given steroids if their vision is threatened or if the protein level in the spinal fluid is high.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outcome depends on the extent of the condition.

Possible Complications

  • Hydrocephalus
  • Blindness or severe visual disability
  • Severe intellectual disability or other neurological problems

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you are pregnant and think you are at risk for the infection. (For example, toxoplasmosis infection can be passed from cats if you clean the cat box.) Call your health care provider if you are pregnant and have not had prenatal care.

Prevention

Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant can be tested to find out if they are at risk for the infection.

Pregnant women who have cats as house pets may be at higher risk. They should avoid contact with cat feces, or things that could be contaminated by insects exposed to cat feces (cockroaches, flies, etc.).

Also, cook meat until it is well done, and wash your hands after handling raw meat to avoid getting the parasite.

References

  1. Petersen E. Toxoplasmosis. Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2007 Jun;12(3):214-23. [PubMed: 17321812]
  2. American Academy of Pediatrics. Toxoplasma gondii infections (toxoplasmosis). In: Red Book: 2012 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 29th, Pickering LK. (Ed), American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, Ill 2012. p.720.

Review Date: 6/9/2013.

Reviewed by: Sameer Patel, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Ill. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsementscof those other sites. © 1997–2011 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

Copyright © 2013, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsementscof those other sites. © 1997–2011 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

Copyright © 2013, A.D.A.M., Inc.

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  • Prenatal education for congenital toxoplasmosisPrenatal education for congenital toxoplasmosis
    Toxoplasmosis infection is caused by a parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Eating or handling raw or insufficiently‐cooked meat, not washing hands thoroughly after gardening, handling contaminated soil or water, or contact with cats' faeces can cause infection. Usually it is asymptomatic and self‐limiting. Primary prevention involves educating the general public, filtering water and improving farm hygiene to reduce animal infection.
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