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A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): A.D.A.M.; 2013.

A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia.

Gigantism

Giantism; Pituitary giant

Last reviewed: November 7, 2013.

Gigantism is abnormal growth due to an excess of growth hormone during childhood.

Causes

The most common cause of too much growth hormone release is a noncancerous (benign) tumor of the pituitary gland. Other causes include:

If excess growth hormone occurs after normal bone growth has stopped, the condition is known as acromegaly.

Gigantism is very rare.

Symptoms

The child will grow in height, as well as in the muscles and organs. This excessive growth makes the child extremely large for his or her age.

Other symptoms include:

Exams and Tests

The doctor will perform a physical exam and ask about the child's symptoms.

Laboratory tests that may be ordered include:

Imaging tests, such as CT or MRI scan of the head, also may be ordered to check for a pituitary tumor.

Treatment

For pituitary tumors with well-defined borders, surgery can cure many cases.

When surgery cannot completely remove the tumor, medicines are used to block or reduce growth hormone release.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Pituitary surgery is usually successful in limiting growth hormone production.

Early treatment can reverse many of the changes caused by growth hormone excess.

Possible Complications

Surgery may lead to low levels of other pituitary hormones, which can cause:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if your child has signs of excessive growth.

References

  1. Melmed S, Kleinberg D. Pituitary masses and tumors. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011: chap 9.

Review Date: 11/7/2013.

Reviewed by: Brent Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsementscof those other sites. © 1997–2011 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

Copyright © 2013, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsementscof those other sites. © 1997–2011 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

Copyright © 2013, A.D.A.M., Inc.

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