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A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): A.D.A.M.; 2013.

A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia.

Multiple myeloma

Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple

Last reviewed: March 23, 2014.

Multiple myeloma is cancer that starts in the plasma cells in bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft, spongy tissue found inside most bones. It helps make blood cells.

Plasma cells help your body fight infection by producing proteins called antibodies. With multiple myeloma, plasma cells grow out of control in the bone marrow and form tumors in the areas of solid bone. The growth of these bone tumors weakens the solid bones and also makes it harder for the bone marrow to make healthy blood cells and platelets

Causes

The exact cause of multiple myeloma is not clear. Past treatment with radiation therapy increases the risk of this type of cancer. Multiple myeloma mainly affects older adults.

Symptoms

Multiple myeloma most commonly causes a low red blood cell count (anemia), which can lead to fatigue and shortness of breath. It can also cause low white blood cell count, which makes you more likely to get infections. Multiple myeloma can also cause low platelet count, which can lead to abnormal bleeding.

As the cancer cells grow in the bone marrow, you may have bone or back pain, most often in the ribs or back.

The cancer cells can weaken bones. You may develop broken bones (bone fractures) just from doing normal activities.

If cancer grows in the spine bones, pressure on the nerves may result. This can lead to numbness or weakness of the arms or legs.

Exams and Tests

Blood tests can help diagnose this disease. These tests include:

Bone x-rays may show fractures or hollowed out areas of bone. If your doctor suspects this type of cancer, a bone marrow biopsy will be performed.

Bone density testing may show bone loss.

Treatment

People who have mild disease or in whom the diagnosis is not certain are often not treated. Instead they are closely monitored. Some people have a slow-developing form of multiple myeloma (smoldering myeloma) that takes years to cause symptoms.

Chemotherapy is usually used to treat multiple myeloma. It is most often given to prevent complications of multiple myeloma, such as bone fractures and kidney damage.

Radiation therapy may be done to relieve bone pain or treat a bone tumor.

Two types of bone marrow transplants may be tried:

  • Autologous bone marrow or stem cell transplantation is done using the person's own stem cells.
  • Allogeneic transplant uses of someone else's stem cells. This treatment has serious risks, but may offer the chance of long-term cure.

Support Groups

You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group. Sharing with others who have common experiences and problems can help you not feel alone.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Survival of multiple myeloma depends on the patient's age and the stage of disease. In some cases, the disease progresses very rapidly. In other cases, it takes years to worsen.

Chemotherapy and transplants rarely lead to a permanent cure.

Possible Complications

Kidney failure is a frequent complication. Others may include:

  • Bone fractures
  • High levels of calcium in the blood, which can be very dangerous
  • Increased chances for infection, especially in the lungs
  • Weakness or loss of movement due to tumor pressing on spinal cord

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your doctor if you have multiple myeloma and you develop an infection, or numbness, loss of movement, or loss of sensation.

References

  1. National Cancer Institute: PDQ Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment. Bethesda, Md: National Cancer Institute. Date last modified: March 12, 2014. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/myeloma/healthprofessional. Accessed: March 23, 2014.
  2. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Multiple Myeloma. Version 2.2014. Available at: http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/myeloma.pdf. Accessed: March 23, 2014.
  3. Rajkumar SV, Dispenzieri A. Multiple myeloma and related disorders. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, et al., eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2013:chap 104.

Review Date: 3/23/2014.

Reviewed by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsementscof those other sites. © 1997–2011 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

Copyright © 2013, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsementscof those other sites. © 1997–2011 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

Copyright © 2013, A.D.A.M., Inc.

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