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A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): A.D.A.M.; 2013.

A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia.

Liver disease

Last reviewed: September 2, 2012.

The term "liver disease" applies to many diseases and disorders that cause the liver to function improperly or stop functioning. Abdominal pain, yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice), or abnormal results of liver function tests suggest you have liver disease.

See also:

References

  1. Martin P. Approach to the patient with liver disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2011:chap 148.

Review Date: 9/2/2012.

Reviewed by: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.

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Copyright © 2013, A.D.A.M., Inc.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only — they do not constitute endorsementscof those other sites. © 1997–2011 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

Copyright © 2013, A.D.A.M., Inc.

What works?

  • Tai Chi to prevent cardiovascular disease
    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a group of conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels that are a worldwide health burden. However, it is thought that CVD risk can be lowered by changing a number of modifiable behaviours including increasing levels of exercise, and relaxation to reduce stress levels, and both of these comprise tai chi. This review assessed the effectiveness of tai chi interventions for healthy adults and adults at high risk of CVD at reducing cardiovascular death, all‐cause death, non‐fatal endpoints (such as heart attacks, strokes and angina) and CVD risk factors.
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Figures

  • Liver fattening, CT scan.
    Liver with disproportional fattening, CT scan.
    Cirrhosis of the liver.

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