Home > Search Results

Treats Parkinson disease and restless legs syndrome.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 37

Meta-analysis of pramipexole in treatment of restless legs syndrome

Bibliographic details: Wang L, Xiao HB, Yan D, Su Y, Sun SG.  Meta-analysis of pramipexole in treatment of restless legs syndrome. Chinese Journal of Neurology 2012; 45(3): 182-187 Available from: http://eng.med.wanfangdata.com.cn/PaperDetail.aspx?qkid=zhsjk&qcode=zhsjk201203010

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Efficacy and tolerability of pramipexole for the treatment of primary restless leg syndrome: a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials

Primary restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a common sensory-motor disorder that is characterized by an irresistible urge to move the limbs and unpleasant sensations in the legs, which affects 1.9%-4.6% adults. Pramipexole, a potent dopamine D2/3 agonist, is recommended as "effective" in the short-term and "possibly effective" in the long-term treatment of primary RLS in the European guidelines on management of RLS. In this meta-analysis, we summarized the efficacy and tolerability of pramipexole in treatment for primary RLS. Results of this meta-analysis showed a favorable effect of pramipexole versus placebo on RLS symptoms (mean change on International RLS Study Group Rating Scale [IRLS] score: mean difference [MD] = -5.96; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -7.79 to -4.41, P < 0.00001) and sleep quality (pooled standard mean difference [SMD] = -0.48, 95% CI: -0.61 to -0.35, P < 0.00001). Nausea (relative risk [RR] = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.82 to 3.95, P < 0.001) and fatigue (RR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.14 to 2.93, P = 0.013) were the most common adverse events, but, by and large, pramipexole was well-tolerated in patients with primary RLS. Nevertheless, long-term studies and more evidence of head-to-head comparisons of pramipexole with other dopamine agonists, anticonvulsants, and levodopa are needed.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

A mixed treatment comparison of gabapentin enacarbil, pramipexole, ropinirole and rotigotine in moderate-to-severe restless legs syndrome

OBJECTIVE: A mixed treatment comparison (MTC) was performed to investigate the relative efficacy and safety of licensed pharmaceuticals for moderate-to-severe restless legs syndrome (RLS).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Comparison of the risk of adverse events with pramipexole and ropinirole in patients with Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis

This review compared the adverse effects of pramipexole and ropinirole with levodopa and placebo in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The authors concluded that, compared with placebo, ropinirole appears to increase rates of hypotension and somnolence more than pramipexole, while pramipexole increases hallucinations more than ropinirole. These drugs were not compared directly, thus the authors' conclusions may not be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Meta-analysis of the efficacy and tolerability of pramipexole versus ropinirole in the treatment of restless legs syndrome

Pramipexole appeared to be more effective and better tolerated than ropinirole for treatment of restless legs syndrome, but should be confirmed in further trials. The authors' cautious conclusions seemed appropriate, but should be considered in light of poorly reported methodology and a lack of quality assessment of the primary studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Treatment for Restless Legs Syndrome [Internet]

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder characterized by unpleasant sensations in the legs and a distressing, irresistible urge to move them. RLS severity and burden vary widely, and the condition may require long-term treatment.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 2012
Show search results within this document

Options for Treating Restless Legs Syndrome: A Review of the Research for Adults

This summary will cover: What RLS is Treatment options for RLS What researchers have found about RLS treatments

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 30, 2013

In the later stages of Parkinson's disease, side effects occur because of the use of levodopa in its treatment.

Four trials have compared pramipexole with placebo in 669 patients with later Parkinson's disease. Two studies were medium term (24 weeks) and 2 studies were short term (4 weeks). Pramipexole significantly reduced the time patients spent in the immobile off state compared with placebo by an average of 1.8 hours. No changes occurred in a dyskinesia rating scale in any of the studies, but dyskinesia recorded as a side effect was reported more frequently with pramipexole. A significant improvement occurred in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) complication score in 2 studies but not in the remaining trials. Significant improvements in UPDRS activities of daily living score occurred with pramipexole in all studies. Significant improvements in UPDRS motor scores in the mobile on state were reported in 3 of the 4 studies. Levodopa dose reduction was allowed in 3 studies and meta‐analysis showed a significant difference in favour of pramipexole. There was a suggestion of more side effects such as nausea, vomiting and dizziness with pramipexole and a definite increase in hallucinations in those given pramipexole. There were significantly fewer withdrawals from pramipexole.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

In the later stages of Parkinson's disease, side effects occur because of the use of levodopa in its treatment.

One trial compared pramipexole with bromocriptine but this was not designed to examine differences between the two treatments as there were too few patients included. However, there was a larger reduction in the time patients spent in the immobile off state with pramipexole therapy compared with bromocriptine by an average of 1.4 hours. No differences occurred in dyskinesia rating scale, dyskinesia as a side effect or Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) complication score. The UPDRS activities of daily living and motor scores showed similar improvements compared to placebo with both agonists. Levodopa dose reduction was similar with both agonists. Subscales of a quality of life measure, the Functional Status Questionnaire, showed significant improvements compared to placebo with both agonists. The finding that another quality of life scale, the EuroQol, improved significantly compared with placebo with pramipexole but not bromocriptine should be treated with caution. Side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and faintness were similar with each agonist, as was the withdrawal from treatment rate.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Dopamine agonists for restless legs syndrome

We could include 38 trials in the meta‐analyses which investigated the efficacy and safety of dopamine agonist treatment compared to placebo or to other treatments for RLS. The studies were performed mostly in European and Northern American countries. Treatment durations varied from one week to seven months, but most treatments had durations of one to 12 weeks. Patients suffered from moderate to severe RLS and were treated with the dopamine agonists cabergoline, lisuride, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine, and sumanirole.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Treatment for Restless Legs Syndrome

In response to a request from the public, a review was undertaken to evaluate the evidence regarding the potential benefits and adverse effects associated with various treatments for restless legs syndrome (RLS). This review did not cover other sleep disorders such as periodic limb movement disorder. The systematic review included 53 reports of randomized clinical trials and observational studies published through June 2012. The online version of this summary and the full report are available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/restless-legs.cfm. This summary is provided to inform discussions with patients of options and to assist in decisionmaking along with consideration of a patient’s values and preferences. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 30, 2013

Parkinson's Disease: National Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Management in Primary and Secondary Care

It is almost 200 years since James Parkinson described the major symptoms of the disease that came to bear his name. Slowly but surely our understanding of the disease has improved and effective treatment has been developed, but Parkinson’s disease remains a huge challenge to those who suffer from it and to those involved in its management. In addition to the difficulties common to other disabling neurological conditions, the management of Parkinson’s disease must take into account the fact that the mainstay of pharmacological treatment, levodopa, can eventually produce dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Furthermore, there are a number of agents besides levodopa that can help parkinsonian symptoms, and there is the enticing but unconfirmed prospect that other treatments might protect against worsening neurological disability. Thus, a considerable degree of judgement is required in tailoring individual therapy and in timing treatment initiation. It is hoped that this guideline on Parkinson’s disease will be of considerable help to those involved at all levels in these difficult management decisions. The guideline has been produced using standard NICE methodology and is therefore based on a thorough search for best evidence.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2006
Show search results within this document

Levodopa for restless legs syndrome

We could include nine trials in the meta‐analysis which compared levodopa treatment to placebo or to other active treatments in RLS and varied from one to eight weeks. Patients suffered from moderate to severe RLS and were treated with doses of 100 mg levodopa/25 mg dopamine decarboxylase up to 400 mg levodopa/100 mg dopamine decarboxylase. The studies were performed in European and Northern American countries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Monoamine oxidase B inhibitors compared with other treatments in early Parkinson's

Many of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease are due to the loss of certain groups of nerves in the brain, which results in the lack of a chemical called dopamine. Currently, there are several different treatments available for people with newly diagnosed Parkinson's including levodopa (Sinemet or Madopar) which is converted into dopamine in the brain, dopamine agonists (for example, ropinirole and pramipexole) which mimic the action of dopamine, and monoamine oxidase B (MAO‐B) inhibitors (selegiline or rasagiline) which reduce the breakdown of dopamine in the brain. Each of these types of drugs has theoretical advantages and disadvantages. For example, although a very good treatment, levodopa can cause involuntary movements (dyskinesia), painful cramps (dystonia) and a shortened response to each dose (motor fluctuations) after a while, whilst MAO‐B inhibitors and dopamine agonists may reduce the risk of these complications but are not so good at improving the symptoms of Parkinson's. At present, therefore, it is not clear which of these three groups of drugs should be prescribed when people with early Parkinson's first need treatment. We reviewed the trials that compared giving MAO‐B inhibitors with other types of medication in people with early Parkinson's to see if there was good evidence that MAO‐B inhibitors were the best treatment to offer. However, unfortunately we only identified two trials (593 patients) so there was only limited evidence. The results showed that MAO‐B inhibitors were less good at improving the symptoms of Parkinson's than either levodopa or dopamine agonists but that they may reduce motor fluctuations compared with levodopa, though not compared with dopamine agonists. MAO‐B inhibitors did, however, have fewer major side effects than some dopamine agonists.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Dopamine agonists for the treatment of people who misuse cocaine

A pharmacological agent with proven efficacy does not exist for treatment of cocaine misuse. Cocaine is an alkaloid derived from the erythroxylon coca leaf that is used as powder for intranasal or intravenous use or as crack, a free‐base form which is smoked. Cocaine misuse is a major public health problem because its use can be associated with medical and psychosocial complications including the spread of infectious diseases (such as AIDS, hepatitis and tuberculosis), crime, violence and neonatal drug exposure. In this Cochrane Review we looked at the evidence on the efficacy and acceptability of dopamine agonists as a treatment, used either alone or in combination with any psychosocial intervention, for people addicted to cocaine.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Fluoxetine compared with other antidepressants for depression in adults

Depression is a severe mental illness characterised by a persistent low mood and loss of all interest and pleasure, usually accompanied by a range of symptoms such as appetite change, sleep disturbance and poor concentration. The predominant treatment options for depression are drugs and psychological therapies, but antidepressant drugs are the most common treatment for moderate to severe depression. Fluoxetine, one of the first new generation antidepressants, is an extremely popular drug treatment for depression. However, findings from studies comparing fluoxetine with other antidepressants are controversial. In this systematic review, the efficacy and tolerability of fluoxetine was compared with other antidepressants for the acute treatment of depression.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Evaluation and Treatment of Tinnitus: Comparative Effectiveness [Internet]

A review was undertaken to evaluate the peer-reviewed literature on three areas of tinnitus management for the following Key Questions (KQs): (1) measures used to assess patients for management needs (KQ1); (2) effectiveness of treatments (KQ2); and (3) identification of prognostic factors (KQ3).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 2013
Show search results within this document

Gabapentin for Adults with Neuropathic Pain: A Review of the Clinical Evidence and Guidelines [Internet]

Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant drug that has been used for a number of off-label indications, including neuropathic pain. It is thought to act by binding to calcium channels and modulating calcium influx, or by blocking new synapse formation. Neuropathic pain tends to be chronic, is complex, and can be difficult to treat effectively. Treatment often involves pharmacologic and physical therapies, although conventional analgesics may not be effective.

Rapid Response Report: Summary with Critical Appraisal - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: September 26, 2014
Show search results within this document

Depression in Adults with a Chronic Physical Health Problem: Treatment and Management

This clinical guideline was commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. It sets out clear, evidenceand consensus-based recommendations for healthcare staff on how to treat and manage depression in adults with a chronic physical health problem.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Use of Mixed Treatment Comparisons in Systematic Reviews [Internet]

To summarize publically available guidance for, and current use of, meta-analytic methods for mixed treatment comparison (MTC) evidence synthesis; to identify analyses using these methods and summarize their characteristics; to gain insight regarding the rationale for selection, implementation, and reporting of such methods from investigators.

Methods Research Reports - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 2012
Show search results within this document

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (67)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...