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About - Dipyridamole

By mouth: Keeps blood clots from forming after some types of heart surgery. Also used to prevent strokes and heart attacks. Used in combination with other medicines.

Injection: Used in place of exercise during certain heart tests.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 68

After a stroke: Does treatment with dipyridamole and ASA have a benefit?

A combination therapy of dipyridamole and ASA has more adverse effects than clopidogrel or ASA alone. It is not proven that the combination drug has benefits over clopidogrel or ASA alone.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: August 30, 2011

Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of clopidogrel and modified-release dipyridamole in the secondary prevention of occlusive vascular events: a systematic review and economic evaluation

This review, conducted by CRD, found evidence to suggest that some treatment strategies using clopidogrel and/or modified-release dipyridamole in the secondary prevention of occlusive vascular events were potentially cost-effective. However, further direct comparisons of clopidogrel and modified-release dipyridamole in combination with aspirin were required.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Dipyridamole + ASA for secondary prevention after a stroke or TIA: Executive summary of final report A09 -01, Version 1.0

The aim of this research was to assess the benefit of treatment with the combination of the two agents dipyridamole plus ASA as secondary prevention after an ischaemic stroke or TIA. This combination therapy was compared to other drug interventions or placebo on the basis of patient-relevant outcomes.

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care: Executive Summaries [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: February 14, 2011

The efficacy and safety of aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin in secondary prevention following TIA or stroke: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

OBJECTIVE: Stroke is becoming a common disease worldwide, and has an increased rate of recurrence yearly after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke. Aspirin, dipyridamole, clopidogrel and aspirin plus dipyridamole combination therapy have been recommended for the secondary prevention of stroke in Americans.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin for prevention of vascular events after stroke or TIA: a meta-analysis

This review concluded that aspirin with dipyridamole was more effective than aspirin alone for preventing stroke and other vascular events in patients with minor stroke and ischaemic attacks; risk reduction was significant increased for trials primarily using extended-release dipyridamole. The authors' conclusions reflected the results of the review and are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Dipyridamole plus aspirin versus aspirin alone in secondary prevention after TIA or stroke: a meta-analysis by risk

This individual patient data review concluded that combination therapy with dipyridamole plus aspirin reduced vascular death/stroke and other vascular events when compared with aspirin alone in patients after a transient ischaemic attack or stroke. There is some uncertainty regarding this conclusion given potential biases and assumptions within the review.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Dipyridamole for preventing recurrent ischemic stroke and other vascular events: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomized controlled trials

This review assessed the use of dipyridamole, with or without aspirin, for preventing stroke in patients with previous ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. The authors concluded that dipyridamole, with or without aspirin, reduced stroke recurrence in this population. The review appeared to support the authors' conclusions, but the incomplete reporting of review methods makes it difficult to confirm the robustness of the conclusions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Clopidogrel and Modified-Release Dipyridamole for the Prevention of Occlusive Vascular Events (Review of Technology Appraisal No. 90): A Systematic Review and Economic Analysis

Occlusive vascular events such as myocardial infarction (MI), ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are the result of a reduction in blood flow associated with an artery becoming narrow or blocked through atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. Peripheral arterial disease is the result of narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the muscles and other tissues, usually in the lower extremities. The primary objective in the treatment of all patients with a history of occlusive vascular events and peripheral arterial disease is to prevent the occurrence of new occlusive vascular events.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: September 2011
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Dipyridamole for preventing stroke and other vascular events in patients with vascular disease

Patients with symptoms of arterial disease have a high risk of getting a (possibly fatal) stroke or heart attack (myocardial infarction). Antiplatelet therapy with drugs like aspirin prevents blood clotting and reduces the risk of strokes, heart attacks, and death from vascular disease. Dipyridamole, another antiplatelet drug, given on its own or together with aspirin might reduce the risk even further. This review included 29 studies involving 23019 participants. When we compared the effects of dipyridamole (alone or together with aspirin) with aspirin alone there was no evidence of an effect on death from vascular causes. When we compared the effects on the occurrence of vascular events (strokes, heart attacks, and deaths from vascular diseases) the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole had an advantage over aspirin alone. This result holds particularly true for patients with ischaemic stroke.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Clopidogrel and modified-release dipyridamole for the prevention of occlusive vascular events (review of technology appraisal no.90): a systematic review and economic analysis

This review found that modified-release dipyridamole with aspirin was better than aspirin in people with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack. The review was well conducted. The reproducibility and generalisability of the results may be limited by the small number of trials and their differences in outcomes reported and treatments applied.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of clopidogrel and modified-release dipyridamole in the secondary prevention of occlusive vascular events: a systematic review and economic evaluation

Eleven databases were searched for randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and reviews for the assessment of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of clopidogrel and MR-dipyridamole. Additional searches were conducted in five databases for systematic reviews of side effects associated with aspirin treatment. A further MEDLINE search was carried out to identify economic costs related to heart disease in the UK.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2004

Clopidogrel and modified-release dipyridamole for the prevention of occlusive vascular events (review of Technology Appraisal No. 90): a systematic review and economic analysis

Occlusive vascular events such as myocardial infarction (MI), ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are the result of a reduction in blood flow associated with an artery becoming narrow or blocked through atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. Peripheral arterial disease is the result of narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the muscles and other tissues, usually in the lower extremities. Patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (typically intermittent claudication) are at increased risk of experiencing an initial occlusive vascular event. Given the nature of the health problem, some people have multivascular disease, disease in more than one vascular bed, and appear to be at even greater risk of death, MI or stroke than those with disease in a single vascular bed. The primary objective in the treatment of all patients with a history of occlusive vascular events and peripheral arterial disease is to prevent the occurrence of new occlusive vascular events.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2011

Comparing Newer Antiplatelet Agents

How do antiplatelet agents compare in acute coronary syndromes managed medically?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: November 10, 2011

Drug Class Review: Newer Antiplatelet Agents: Final Update 2 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of clopidogrel, ticlopidine, extended-release dipyridamole and aspirin and prasugrel in adults with acute coronary syndromes or coronary revascularization (stenting, bypass grafting), ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, or symptomatic peripheral vascular disease.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: June 2011
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The safe use of anti-clotting medication

When we hurt ourselves and it starts to bleed, our bodies make sure that the bleeding soon stops and a clump of blood (a blood clot) forms to close the wound. This reaction is very important, because it ensures that we lose as little blood as possible, stops germs from getting into the wound, and allows the wound to heal.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: June 9, 2011

Stable Angina: Methods, Evidence & Guidance [Internet]

Angina is pain or constricting discomfort that typically occurs in the front of the chest (but may radiate to the neck, shoulders, jaw or arms) and is brought on by physical exertion or emotional stress. It is the main symptomatic manifestation of myocardial ischaemia and is usually caused by obstructive coronary artery disease restricting oxygen delivery to the cardiac myocytes. Other factors may exacerbate angina either by further restricting oxygen delivery (for example severe anaemia) or by increasing oxygen demand (for example left ventricular hypertrophy). Angina symptoms are associated with other cardiac disease such as aortic stenosis but the management of angina associated with non-coronary artery disease is outside the scope of this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guidelines Centre (UK).

Version: July 2011
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Noninvasive Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease in Women [Internet]

To conduct a systematic review of the medical literature assessing (1) accuracy of noninvasive technologies (NITs) for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) in women with symptoms suspicious for CAD, (2) predictors affecting test accuracy, (3) ability of NITs to provide risk stratification, prognostic information, inform decisionmaking about treatment options, and affect clinical outcomes, and (4) risks to women undergoing these tests.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 2012
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Drug Class Review: Beta Adrenergic Blockers: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Beta blockers inhibit the chronotropic, inotropic, and vasoconstrictor responses to the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Beta blockers differ in their duration of effect (3 hours to 22 hours), the types of beta receptors they block (β1-selective or β1/β2-nonselective), whether they are simultaneously capable of exerting low level heart rate increases (intrinsic sympathomimetic activity [ISA]), and in whether they provide additional blood vessel dilation effects by also blocking alpha-1 receptors. All beta blockers are approved for the treatment of hypertension. Other US Food and Drug Administration-approved uses are specific to each beta blocker and include stable and unstable angina, atrial arrhythmias, bleeding esophageal varices, coronary artery disease, asymptomatic and symptomatic heart failure, migraine, and secondary prevention of post-myocardial infarction. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of beta blockers in adult patients with hypertension, angina, coronary artery bypass graft, recent myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial arrhythmia, migraine or bleeding esophageal varices.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2009
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Pharmacologic and Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism Among Special Populations [Internet]

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a prevalent and avoidable complication of hospitalization. Patients hospitalized with trauma, traumatic brain injury, burns, or liver disease; patients on antiplatelet therapy; obese or underweight patients; those having obesity surgery; or with acute or chronic renal failure have unequal risks for bleeding and thrombosis and may benefit differently from prophylactic therapy medication.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2013
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Drug Class Review: Agents for Overactive Bladder: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Overactive bladder is defined by the International Continence Society as a syndrome of urinary frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence, appearing in the absence of local pathological factors. Treatment of overactive bladder syndrome first requires a clear diagnosis. In patients with incontinence, multiple forms can be present and it is important to determine which form is dominant. Non-pharmacologic, non-surgical treatment consists of behavioral training (prompted voiding, bladder training, pelvic muscle rehabilitation), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, catheterization, and use of absorbent pads. Pharmacologic treatment for overactive bladder syndrome includes darifenacin, flavoxate hydrochloride, hyoscyamine, oxybutynin chloride, tolterodine tartrate, trospium chloride, scopolamine transdermal, and solifenacin succinate. The purpose of this systematic review is to compare the benefits and harms of drugs used to treat overactive bladder syndrome.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: March 2009
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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