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Results: 1 to 20 of 97

Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia as a predictor of sudden cardiac death in patients with left ventricular dysfunction: a meta-analysis

This review concluded that non-sustained ventricular tachycardia was a significant predictor for arrhythmic events in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, regardless of aetiology and left ventricular ejection fraction. Although this was a generally a well-conducted review, the limitations of the available evidence may compromise the reliability of the pooled estimates

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Antidysrhythmic drug therapy for the termination of stable, monomorphic ventricular tachycardia: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: We performed a systematic review of the literature to compare the efficacy of different drug therapies for the termination of stable, monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Meta-analysis of catheter ablation as an adjunct to medical therapy for treatment of ventricular tachycardia in patients with structural heart disease

BACKGROUND: Most studies of catheter ablation for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (VT) are relatively small observational trials.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Meta-analysis of the effectiveness and safety of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients with versus without left ventricular systolic dysfunction

The review concluded that limited data suggested patients with/without left ventricular systolic dysfunction had similar risk for recurrent atrial fibrillation/atrial tachycardia after catheter ablation, but repeat procedures were needed more often in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (heart failure). Despite some review limitations, these cautious conclusions reflect the limited evidence presented and appear likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

The effect of aldosterone antagonists for ventricular arrhythmia: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from cardiac arrest, one of the most common types of cardiac-related death, is most often triggered by ventricular arrhythmia (VA). It has been reported that aldosterone antagonists (AAs) have the benefit of reducing SCD in patients with heart failure (HF). It also has been indicated in animal experiments and clinical trials that AAs may have an antiarrhythmic effect.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Safety and efficacy of the remote magnetic navigation for ablation of ventricular tachycardias: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: Remote magnetic navigation (RMN) is considered to be a solution for mapping and ablation of several arrhythmias. In this systematic review we aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of RMN in ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Do omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce risk of sudden cardiac death and ventricular arrhythmias? A meta-analysis of randomized trials

INTRODUCTION: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have demonstrated to have antiarrhythmic properties. However, randomized studies have shown inconsistent results.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Implantable cardioverter defibrillators in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy: patient outcomes, incidence of appropriate and inappropriate interventions, and complications

BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is a cardiomyopathy characterized by ventricular arrhythmias and an abnormal right ventricle. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy may prevent sudden cardiac death in patients with ARVD/C. Currently, an overview of outcomes, appropriate and inappropriate interventions, and complications of ICD therapy in ARVD/C is lacking.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Venturing into ventricular arrhythmia storm: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Ablation has substantial evidence base in the management of ventricular arrhythmia (VA). It can be a 'lifesaving' procedure in the acute setting of VA storm. Current reports on ablation in VA storm are in the form of small series and have relative small representation in a large observational series. The purpose of this study was to systematically synthesize the available literature to appreciate the efficacy and safety of ablation in the setting of VA storm. The medical electronic databases through 31 January 2012 were searched. Ventricular arrhythmia storm was defined as recurrent (≥ 3 episodes or defibrillator therapies in 24 h) or incessant (continuous >12 h) VA. Studies reporting data on VA storm patients at the individual or study level were included. A total of 471 VA storm patients from 39 publications were collated for the analysis. All VAs were successfully ablated in 72% [95% confidence interval (CI) 71-89%] and 9% (95% CI: 3-10%) had a failed procedure. Procedure-related mortality occurred in three patients (0.6%). Only 6% patients had a recurrence of VA storm. The recurrence of VA was significantly higher after ablation for arrhythmic storm of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) relative to ventricular fibrillation or polymorphic VT with underlying cardiomyopathy (odds ratio 3.76; 95% CI: 1.65-8.57; P = 0.002). During the follow-up (61 ± 37 weeks), 17% of patients died (heart failure 62%, arrhythmias 23%, and non-cardiac 15%) with 55% deaths occurring within 12 weeks of intervention. The odds of death were four times higher after a failed procedure compared with those with a successful procedure (95% CI: 2.04-8.01, P < 0.001). Ventricular arrhythmia storm ablation has high-acute success rates, with a low rate of recurrent storms. Heart failure is the dominant cause of death in the long term. Failure of the acute procedure carries a high mortality.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins) and arrhythmias: systematic review and meta-analysis

This review concluded that hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase Inhibitors (statins) decreased the incidence and recurrence of atrial fibrillation and incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, but their use as anti-arrhythmic drugs could not be recommended and further research was needed. Interpretation of the authors' conclusions should take into account the limitations with the included studies and uncertainty with the pooling of the studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Treatment of elderly hypertensive patients with epithelial sodium channel inhibitors combined with a thiazide diuretic reduces coronary mortality and sudden cardiac death

The authors concluded that use of an epithelial sodium channel inhibitor combined with hydrochlorothiazide for treatment of hypertension in elderly patients resulted in favourable effects on coronary mortality or sudden cardiac death. The reliability of the conclusions is uncertain given a number of weaknesses in the review methods (risk of error and bias, unclear quality of included studies).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Statin therapy significantly reduces risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator

The review suggested an association between the use of statins and a reduction in the ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurrence in recipients of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, mainly in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy. The restricted study design reviewed, coupled with significant variation across studies, means the clinical relevance and reliability of the authors' conclusions is uncertain.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

The effect of statin therapy on ventricular tachyarrhythmias: a meta-analysis

The authors concluded that available evidence suggested statins may have been associated with reduced risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with coronary artery disease. Further large-scale randomised trials were needed. Given the limited search, unclear quality of included studies and possible limitations in the analysis, the authors' caution is warranted.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Effect of fish oil on ventricular tachyarrhythmia in three studies in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators

The review concluded that there was no evidence of a protective effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish oil against recurrent life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The authors' conclusions appeared to reflect the evidence presented, but limitations in the review methodology and the small number of included trials mean their reliability is uncertain.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Cardiac resynchronization and death from progressive heart failure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

This review assessed whether cardiac resynchronization (a type of pacemaker-based therapy) reduces mortality from progressive heart failure. The authors found that mortality during 3 to 6 months of follow-up was significantly reduced among patients who received cardiac resynchronization compared with controls. This was a well-conducted and clearly reported review.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Vasopressin for cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis

This review assessed the effectiveness of vasopressin compared with epinephrine in the treatment of cardiac arrest. The authors concluded that vasopressin has no clear advantage over epinephrine in this context. This appears to be a well designed and conducted systematic review, so the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Carbohydrate and Lipid Disorders and Relevant Considerations in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury

To assess the prevalence of carbohydrate and lipid disorders in adults with chronic spinal cord injury and evaluate their risk contribution to cardiovascular diseases and the potential impact of exercise and pharmacologic and dietary therapies to alter these disorders and reduce cardiovascular disease risk.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: January 2008
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Drug Class Review: Agents for Overactive Bladder: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Overactive bladder is defined by the International Continence Society as a syndrome of urinary frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence, appearing in the absence of local pathological factors. Treatment of overactive bladder syndrome first requires a clear diagnosis. In patients with incontinence, multiple forms can be present and it is important to determine which form is dominant. Non-pharmacologic, non-surgical treatment consists of behavioral training (prompted voiding, bladder training, pelvic muscle rehabilitation), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, catheterization, and use of absorbent pads. Pharmacologic treatment for overactive bladder syndrome includes darifenacin, flavoxate hydrochloride, hyoscyamine, oxybutynin chloride, tolterodine tartrate, trospium chloride, scopolamine transdermal, and solifenacin succinate. The purpose of this systematic review is to compare the benefits and harms of drugs used to treat overactive bladder syndrome.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: March 2009
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Chest Pain of Recent Onset: Assessment and Diagnosis of Recent Onset Chest Pain or Discomfort of Suspected Cardiac Origin [Internet]

Chest pain or discomfort caused by acute coronary syndromes (ACS) or angina has a potentially poor prognosis, emphasising the importance of prompt and accurate diagnosis. Treatments are available to improve symptoms and prolong life, hence the need for this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre for Acute and Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: March 2010
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Drug Class Review: Newer Drugs for Insomnia: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]

Insomnia is a serious health problem that affects millions of people. Population surveys have estimated the prevalence of insomnia to be about 30% to 50% of the general population. About three-fourths of people who have trouble sleeping say that the problem is "occasional," averaging about 6 nights per month, with one-fourth having frequent or chronic insomnia, averaging about 16 nights per month. Individuals with insomnia most often report a combination of difficulty falling asleep and intermittent wakefulness during sleep. Treatment of insomnia involves behavioral changes, such as minimizing habits that interfere with sleep (for example, drinking coffee or engaging in stressful activities in the evening), and pharmacotherapy with sedating antidepressants (for example, trazodone), sedating antihistamines, anticholinergics, benzodiazepines, or nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics. The benzodiazepines and the newer sedative hypnotics zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, and eszopiclone work through gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors. Ramelteon, a hypnotic approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 2005, is a selective melatonin receptor (MT1 and MT2) agonist. New nonbenzodiazepine drugs have been sought for multiple reasons, including reduction of the risk of tolerance, dependence, and abuse associated with benzodiazepines. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the comparative evidence on benefits and harms of these medications in people with insomnia to help policymakers and clinicians make informed choices about the use of newer drugs for insomnia.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: October 2008
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