Home > Search Results
  • We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 1 to 20 of 33

The role of mechanical bowel preparation before ileal urinary diversion: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Background: Although the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is still widely promoted as the dogma before patients undergo ileal urinary diversion, an increasing number of clinical trials have suggested that there is no benefit. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of MBP in ileal urinary diversion surgery. Methods: A literature search was performed in electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded as well as the Cochrane Library and the Cochrane Clinical Trials Registry, from 1966 to January 1, 2013. Clinical trials comparing outcomes of MBP versus no MBP for ileal urinary diversion surgery were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the fixed- or random-effects models. Results: In total, two randomized controlled trials and five cohort studies were included in this meta-analysis. The primary outcomes, such as bowel leak and bowel obstruction, showed no statistical difference between the two groups. Additionally, the overall mortality rate and death rate related to operation also manifested that MBP does not offer an advantage over the no MBP. Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that MBP does not reduce the incidence of perioperative complications in urinary diversion compared with no MBP. However, large randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to confirm this finding. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Does using comprehensive preoperative bowel preparation offer any advantage for urinary diversion using ileum? A meta-analysis

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of comprehensive bowel preparation to that of limited bowel preparation in prevention of postoperative complications in elective urinary diversion surgery by using ileum.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Urinary diversion and bladder reconstruction/replacement using intestinal segments for intractable incontinence following bladder surgery

The normal urinary bladder is a hollow muscular organ that lies deep in the pelvis. It functions through the balanced activity of many inter‐related nerves and muscles that contain or empty urine as needed. If the bladder has been damaged by disease, surgery can be performed to divert the urine from the bladder (urinary diversion), to reconstruct the bladder or to replace the bladder with intestinal segments. The review did not find enough evidence from trials to show which surgical options are the most effective. One small trial suggested that the ileum bowel segment (small bowel) may be better compared to ileocolonic bowel segment (combination of small and large bowel) for night time incontinence. More research is needed to determine the most effective surgical methods for urinary diversion, reconstruction or replacement of the urinary bladder that has been damaged by disease.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Urinary Incontinence in Neurological Disease: Management of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Neurological Disease

The guideline covers adults and children (from birth) with lower urinary tract dysfunction resulting from neurological disease or injury.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2012
Show search results within this document

Urinary Incontinence: The Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women

Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common symptom that can affect women of all ages, with a wide range of severity and nature. While rarely life-threatening, incontinence may seriously influence the physical, psychological and social wellbeing of affected individuals. The impact on the families and carers of women with UI may be profound, and the resource implications for the health considerable.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: October 2006
Show search results within this document

The Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men [Internet]

The guideline covers men (18 and over) with a clinical working diagnosis of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Options for conservative, pharmacological, surgical, and complementary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Systematic review and economic modelling of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of non-surgical treatments for women with stress urinary incontinence

The treatment options for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) can be classified as non-surgical and surgical. Lifestyle changes, such as weight loss, smoking cessation, etc. may reduce the risk of leakage but all need continued adherence. Non-surgical interventions, such as pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), biofeedback (BF), electrical stimulation (ES), bladder training (BT), vaginal cones (VCs), etc., may also require long-term adherence to the taught programmes in order to produce continued benefit. However, these interventions have few adverse events compared with surgical treatment. Alternatively, the leakage can be contained using absorbent pads, an indwelling urinary catheter or, very rarely, urinary diversion.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (UK).

Version: 2010

Urinary Tract Infection in Children: Diagnosis, Treatment and Long-term Management

In the past 30–50 years, the natural history of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children has changed as a result of the introduction of antibiotics and improvements in health care. This change has contributed to uncertainty about the most appropriate and effective way to diagnose and treat UTI in children and whether or not investigations and follow-up are justified.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2007
Show search results within this document

Making Health Care Safer II: An Updated Critical Analysis of the Evidence for Patient Safety Practices

To review important patient safety practices for evidence of effectiveness, implementation, and adoption.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2013

Long-term follow-up of functional outcome in patients with a cloacal malformation: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Reconstructive surgery is performed in patients with cloacal malformations to achieve anorectal, urological, and gynecological function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of cloacal malformation repair as reported in literature.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Catheter policies for management of long‐term voiding problems in adults with nerve damage affecting the bladder

People with nerve damage affecting the bladder may have incontinence (leakage of urine) or an inability to empty the bladder (voiding problem). This may cause infections or damage to the kidneys. Treatments include a permanent urinary catheter; using a catheter intermittently whenever the bladder needs to be emptied; an external sheath catheter fitted to the penis; or timed voiding, which involves regular emptying of the bladder at timed intervals. Although all these methods are used in practice, the review found that no randomised trials have been conducted to provide good evidence to suggest which is best and in which circumstances.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of urethral cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: March 12, 2014

Prostate Cancer: Diagnosis and Treatment

Prostate cancer is one of the commonest cancers in men. Each year there are about 27,773 new cases in England and Wales, and 9161 deaths. Prostate cancer is predominantly a disease of older men but around 20% of cases occur in men under the age of 65. Over the past 10 to 15 years there have been a number of significant advances in its management but also a number of major controversies, especially about the clinical management of patients with early, non-metastatic disease. These uncertainties clearly cause anxieties for patients and their families. There is evidence of practice variation around the country and of patchy availability of certain treatments and procedures. A clinical guideline will help to address these issues and offer guidance on best practice.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: February 2008
Show search results within this document

Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of bladder cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 2, 2014

Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of bladder cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: July 11, 2014

Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of urethral cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: November 14, 2013

Vulvar Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of vulvar cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: March 12, 2014

Drug Class Review: Pharmacologic Treatments for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Final Update 4 Report [Internet]

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects children and adults and is treated with both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Multiple drugs are used to treat ADHD. This review evaluates the evidence on how these drugs compare to each other in benefits and harms.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: December 2011
Show search results within this document

Recurrent Nephrolithiasis in Adults: Comparative Effectiveness of Preventive Medical Strategies [Internet]

To determine the efficacy and harms of diet and pharmacological interventions for preventing recurrent kidney stones, and whether stone composition and pre- and post-treatment biochemistries predict treatment efficacy.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: July 2012
Show search results within this document

Faecal Incontinence: The Management of Faecal Incontinence in Adults

For many people faecal incontinence is the result of a complex interplay of contributing factors, many of which can co-exist. Some may be relatively simple to reverse.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Acute Care (UK).

Version: 2007
Show search results within this document

Medical Encyclopedia

  • Urethral stricture
    Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing of the tube that carries urine out of the body from the bladder (urethra).
  • Neurogenic bladder
    Neurogenic bladder is a problem in which a person lacks bladder control due to a brain, spinal cord, or nerve condition.
  • Bowel incontinence
    Bowel incontinence is the loss of bowel control, leading to an involuntary passage of stool. This can range from occasionally leaking a small amount of stool and passing gas, to completely losing control of bowel movements.
See all (3)...

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (151)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...